Zipcar moves into two more transit centers

Gateway_Zipcar2

We have more ways for you to move around town as Zipcar has expanded to the Willow Creek/SW 185th Transit Center in Hillsboro and Parkrose/Sumner Transit Center in Northeast Portland. Our car-sharing friends have just added two dedicated parking spots to these transit centers as well as a third one at Gateway/NE 99th Transit Center.

“The relatively quick uptake in these areas demonstrates very strong demand for more sustainable alternatives to car ownership in areas further away from the urban core,” says Jeremy Nelson, General Manager for Zipcar in the Portland metro area.

Zipcar also has vehicles available at the following locations:

There are 18 Zipcars available at TriMet transit centers and more than 200 within a five-minute walk of transit stops in the metro area. Look for the large green signs: “Zipcars live here.”

Gateway_Zipcar

“I’ve been really amazed by the demand we’ve received for Zipcars at transit centers surrounding Portland in all directions,” Nelson says. “What started as a modest launch at two transit centers has grown to eight in a little over a year. We’re going to continue to push these boundaries as demand dictates.”

Zipcar can be used by the hour or daily. Gas and insurance are included. Check out all the Zipcar locations at TriMet transit centers.

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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You asked: Will there be Park & Rides along the MAX Orange Line?

Commuters in Southeast will be happy to know that we’re adding two Park & Ride facilities, along with two Bike & Rides, to the system with the opening of the Orange Line.

Whether you’re meeting your carpool, catching the bus or hopping on a train, you can park free up to 24 hours at both new Park & Ride locations. (You can park overnight, too, as long as you observe the 24-hour limit.)

SE Tacoma St/Johnson Creek Station
318 cars, 72 bikes

The SE Tacoma St/Johnson Creek Station is located near the Sellwood, Westmoreland, Ardenwald-Johnson Creek and Eastmoreland neighborhoods in SE Portland. The station is connected to the Springwater Corridor Trail, which runs from the Willamette River, through Gresham and out to Boring.

Along with 318 parking spaces, this station has a Bike & Ride facility with secure bike parking for 72 bikes, in addition to 34 bike rack spaces. There are also electric vehicle chargers with universal port connections.

This lot is expected to fill up quickly on weekdays. As an alternative, use the 401-space garage at SE Park Station (below).

SE Park Ave Station
401 cars, 74 bikes

The SE Park Ave Station, in Clackamas County’s Oak Grove neighborhood, is the Orange Line’s southern terminal. The station’s Park & Ride has 401 parking spaces, plus seven electric vehicle charging stations. Bike commuters can use the station’s Bike & Ride, which holds 74 bicycles, with an additional 28 bike rack spaces available at the station.

A signature feature of this Park & Ride is the building’s rooftop solar array. It will provide enough energy to offset annual electricity usage for the building’s basic functions like elevator and light usage — making it a net zero facility.

Nearby: Milwaukie Park & Ride

Another commute alternative is the the 329-space Milwaukie Park & Ride at SE Main Street & Milport Road, south of the SE Tacoma St/Johnson Creek Station. While it’s not located at a MAX station, it’s served  by bus lines 34-Linwood/River Rd and 99-Macadam/McLoughlin, which connect to MAX on weekdays.

Learn more about the MAX Orange Line, station by station »
Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Orange All Around: Recapping the Orange Picnic + Fireworks Spectacular [VIDEO]

Last Saturday, a hazy orange day turned into a dazzling orange night.

The line of picnic-goers waiting to get in to Zidell Yards, a former shipbuilding site nestled between Tilikum Crossing and the Ross Island Bridge, popped with orange: shirts, hats, sundresses, blankets. At 5 p.m., picnickers began streaming in to the festival site, where they were greeted with games, food carts, a beer garden and a set by the Student Loan Stringband.

Kids chased bubbles and ate ice cream (Salt & Straw debuted their honorary Orange Line flavor: Olive Oil and Burnt Orange Marmalade) and curious onlookers chatted with the Portland Picnic Society about their picture-perfect spread.

Families and friends claimed tables and tucked into their orange picnics as Bearwater took the stage, and the deep orange sun dipped out of sight.

Thousands more spectators flooded in and lined the riverbank, buzzing with anticipation for the fireworks (and maybe a glass of BridgePort’s Orange Line IPA, too). And then it was time.

All eyes were on Tilikum Crossing as the show began with a magnificent cascade of white light pouring off the bridge’s deck. The crowd gasped as the sky lit up: red, purple, yellow, blue — and, of course, orange.

And to prove how well-planned the display was, even the soundtrack sparked joy. The Decemberists’ “On the Bus Mall” played our heartstrings and Washed Out’s “Feel It All Around” proved undeniable, despite its renown as the Portlandia theme song.

The grand finale was an incredible sight, as glittering bursts spanned the entire sky above the bridge.

For those 12 minutes it became clear that we were celebrating more than a bridge or a light rail line. I’m an optimist, but I’d say we were cheering for each other. Community — that’s what gets us out of the house wearing blaze orange and sits us down with thousands of neighbors we’ve never met. So to everyone who shared this special night with us: Thank you.

Orange Picnic + Fireworks Spectacular (music: “Good Times” by …Last Saturday’s all-orange party was one for the ages: bit.ly/1NQi0EvTo everyone who helped make the night special: Thank you!

Posted by TriMet on Monday, August 24, 2015

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Tilikum Crossing: Set Apart by Design

Building a new bridge across the Willamette River is a big deal.

So when it came to designing the first span over the river since the Fremont Bridge opened 42 years ago, we approached every aspect of Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, with an imaginative and intentional eye for the details.

At more than 1,700 feet in length, Tilikum Crossing is the only bridge of its kind in the U.S. The bridge will carry MAX trains, buses, streetcars, cyclists and pedestrians starting Sept. 12, 2015.

From the beginning, the bridge was designed to be different. Carrying transit, bicyclists and pedestrians — but no cars or trucks — meant the structure could be radically streamlined. A bridge built to accommodate private automobiles could easily be twice the width of Tilikum Crossing, because it would need extra lanes, places to pull off and ramps at either end.

Donald MacDonald, a San Francisco architect whose portfolio includes the new San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, envisioned something special for the small bridge. The cables on most cable-stayed bridges attach at the deck and on the tower, which bears the load. But given Tilikum Crossing’s size, 10 single cables could be threaded through each of its four towers, creating elegant triangular forms that mimic the distant slopes of Mt. Hood.

Artist Errol Beard's rendering of Tilikum Crossing
Artist Errol Beard’s rendering of Tilikum Crossing

Tilikum Crossing’s thin deck keeps its footprint small, though it offers plenty to cyclists and pedestrians. The paths on each side are 14 feet wide — the widest of any Portland bridge — and even larger at the belvederes, where they wrap around the towers.

CityLab: Why Portland is Building a Multi-Modal Bridge that Bans Cars

You might think Tilikum Crossing’s light, open look would be overshadowed by its neighbors — tall, stately Ross Island Bridge to the south and the Marquam Bridge’s utilitarian decks to the north — but even its presence has been carefully calculated. By day, it’s airy and even (at risk of sounding cheesy) aspiring. Its towers assert themselves without overreaching and it stands comfortably in its place.

At night, though, is when the bridge really stands apart. Artist Doug Hollis and his wife, the late Anna Valentina Murch, along with programmer Morgan Barnard, created an aesthetic lighting program that will control the 178 LEDs that illuminate the bridge. The program pulls data from the USGS river monitor and adjusts the lights’ colors according to the water’s height, speed and temperature.

Even its name figures into Tilikum Crossing’s design. Tilikum is the Chinook Wawa word for “people” — hence Bridge of the People. Historian Chet Orloff, chair of the committee that named the bridge, says the name was selected because it connects our region’s past with the promise of its future.

“Tilikum symbolizes coming together. It conveys connections, in not only the relationships between people, but in the connections we will make as we ride, walk, run and cycle across this beautiful new bridge,” said Orloff.

If the staggering turnout at our recent People’s Preview is any indication, the name fits. That Sunday, more than 40,000 friends, families and neighbors came together and celebrated their bridge. Could there be a more meaningful endorsement of Tilikum Crossing’s unique design?

Bridge facts
  • The first span over the Willamette in the Portland area since the Fremont Bridge in 1973
  • Four-pier cable-stayed bridge type (two piers on land, two in the water at the towers)
  • About 1,720 feet in length
  • Two towers, each 180 feet high
  • 75.5 feet wide (110.5 feet at the towers)
  • About 3.5 miles of cable
  • 14-foot-wide path for cyclists and pedestrians (one on each side)
  • 25 mph max. speed for buses and trains
  • For transit, pedestrians and cyclists only

Learn more: Tilikum Crossing and the MAX Orange Line »

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Cruising past the million-mile safety milestone

Robert Boos thought his TriMet career was over before it began.

“I was 21 years old, thinking about going into the Coast Guard and kind of scared to death of driving a bus,” Boos recalls. “I applied at TriMet and got called into an interview. I thought I blew the interview.”

He didn’t. Thirty-one years later, Boos is our latest inductee into the Million Mile Club, which honors operators who have exemplary safety and customer service marks.

How far is a million miles? It’s like driving around Earth 40 times. Or making 172 trips from Boos’ home in Milwaukie to New York City… and back.

“Who thinks they’re going to be in the Million Mile club?” Boos says. “It’s almost impossible to do. It’s not something you think about. I guess it’s luck, that’s all I can say.”

However, it’s more than luck that the National Safety Council has given him a Safe Driver Award every year, earned by driving without a preventable accident—a feat that takes diligence and an unrelenting focus on safety.

Times certainly have changed since Boos began driving a bus in 1984. Back then, many of them didn’t have power steering. They also had less-advanced communications systems and high floors.

“I really like the low floor with no steps—it’s like driving a go-kart,” Boos says.

All in the family

Outside of work, Boos enjoys taking his 3-year-old grandson to the park, going out to sushi with his wife or hiking on the Oregon Coast at Cape Lookout or Drift Creek Falls.

His father, Keith, ran 12 convenience stores in the area called Keith’s Markets. Keith eventually left to work at TriMet, first as a bus driver for nine years and then a trainer for 18 years. Six months after Keith retired from TriMet in 2002, he suffered a massive heart attack while on a golf course. The next day, he had open-heart surgery and survived. Today, he’s in good health.

Don’t hit snooze

The secret to his success?

“All you have to do is be diligent,” says Boos, who drives Line 23 in the Parkrose neighborhood. “If you’re not going to get up in the morning or be on time, you’re not going to make it as a bus driver.”

There’s something about working at TriMet that’s helped him get up every morning for the past 30 years.

“It feels like I’m my own boss. I like the routine,” he says. “I sign in, get on the bus, go get my coffee. When I’m done, I park the bus and go home.”

Congratulations, Robert!

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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Pardon our dust! Upgrades are coming to our oldest MAX stations

This spring and summer, you may have come across crews at MAX stations putting in underground cables to power TriMet’s future electronic fare (e-fare) system. Riders who use our oldest MAX stations will notice more construction coming soon—as we get to work on even more improvements to make your ride better.

Starting next week, we’re updating 14 stations from Hollywood/NE 42nd Ave Transit Center to Cleveland Ave in Gresham. These stations opened when we launched our first light rail line, the Eastside MAX Blue Line, in 1986.

E 172nd Ave Station is among the original Eastside MAX Blue Line stations, which opened on Sept. 5, 1986. The station and 13 others will get makeovers that include sleeker shelters, added lighting, a more open look and feel, and equipment for TriMet’s upcoming e-fare system.
E 172nd Ave Station is among the original Eastside MAX Blue Line stations, which opened on Sept. 5, 1986. The station and 13 others will get makeovers that include sleeker shelters, added lighting, a more open look and feel, and equipment for our upcoming e-fare system.

There’s lots of work to do:

  • Add more and brighter lighting
  • Upgrade security cameras to digital technology
  • Give platforms a more open look and feel
  • Update the design of shelters
  • Add digital information displays
  • Install cables and equipment for e-fare

The construction will take about five years and will be broken up into phases. We aim to do as much as possible in work zones, rather than closing the entire station, to make the work less of an inconvenience.

FutureStationDesign

The first phase will focus on platform entrances and getting the stations ready for e-fare. Crews will start working on Monday, August 17, at our Ruby Junction/E 197th Ave Station, and you’ll see workers soon after at our E 102nd Ave, 122nd Ave and 148th Ave stations.

Learn more about how we’re making transit better

Roberta Altstadt

Roberta Altstadt

I’m TriMet’s public information officer. I communicate with the news media on all TriMet-related topics. When I’m not busy working, I like learning new skills, gardening, and going for walks with my sweet three-legged dog, Ernie.

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You asked: Why is the bridge still closed?

During the People’s Preview, many of you asked why Tilikum Crossing won’t be open for another month. Truth is, we’re almost done—We’ve just got a few things to finish in the next 30 days to ensure the bridge is safe and ready for use!

  • We have safety improvements to complete along the bicycle and pedestrian pathways on the bridge, like striping—our word for painting—a line to clearly define where the bike lane is.
  • There are also some areas on the pathways that need additional concrete work.
  • We still have interpretive signs to install at the belvederes (the extra space on the bridge that juts out).
  • Our Fireworks Spectacular event on August 22 will require us to close the pathways for about four days.
  • Lastly, we’re continuing to train our operators on the new MAX Orange Line for the next month. On August 30 we’ll begin “simulated service”—which means trains will be running on their actual schedules, but without riders.

We can’t wait for Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, to open—but the wait is definitely worth it! In the meantime, feed your anticipation at one of our “Catch the Orange” events or stay in the loop with email updates.

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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