Parking and riding? Four tips to prevent car break-ins

No one likes to walk up to their car and see their window busted out and belongings gone.

Car break-ins are crimes of opportunity. Just the other day, I was walking through a parking lot with some fellow Transit Police officers and spotted a purse sitting in plain view on the back seat of a Honda Civic.

Whether using a Park & Ride, parking at your office lot or just parked on the street outside your house, take these few simple precautions to not become a victim.

Don’t give them the opportunity

Thieves will make a split-second decision to break into a vehicle. If they see something of value through the window, that’s an opportunity. Do not leave valuable items — purses, computers, phones, shopping bags — visible in your car. Better yet, leave them at home or take them with you when you go.

Leave it “showroom” clean

Even the small stuff like chargers and ear buds give thieves cause to think there may be a mobile phone, GPS or other electronics inside. Sunglasses and spare change might not seem like much to you, but for those doing “smash and grabs” it can add up. Tuck it all away and leave your car “showroom” clean — just like it came from a dealership

Stow before you go

If you absolutely have to leave items in the car, stow them in the trunk, under the cargo cover or in the console before you go. Even tuck that charger away before you reach your destination. You never know who might be watching what you’re doing after you park.

Lock it

An unlocked car is an invitation, not just to take the stuff inside but to steal the car itself. Don’t make it easy for thieves. Check to make sure it is locked before you walk away, whether you test the door handle(s) or hit the lock button until the horn beeps.

Taking these simple steps can keep you from becoming a victim. If you happen to see someone hanging around a Park & Ride or spot an item left on a platform, say something — Call 9-1-1 or alert a TriMet employee.

And, please remember, whether you use a Park & Ride, catch the train in your neighborhood or are just walking along a city street, be aware and be safe. Take just a moment before crossing train tracks or the street to look up, look around and make sure it is safe to cross.

Christina Hansen-Tuma

Christina Hansen-Tuma

I’m Officer Christina Hansen-Tuma with the Transit Police Division. Working in transit, I get to meet different people across the metro area and help make TriMet a system that my grandmother would enjoy riding. When I’m not on the job, I’m busy spending time with my kids and running in marathons!

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