Author Archives: Harry Saporta

About Harry Saporta

As TriMet's Safety and Security Executive, I lead the agency's efforts to make safety not only a priority but a core value. I have more than 30 years of experience in the field, having worked on a number of major transit projects around the world. Most recently, I worked in Abu Dhabi as lead of the Surface Transport Safety and Security Project. I also served as director of safety and security for the Federal Transit Administration.

3 essential tips for keeping your smartphone or tablet safe on transit

Rider with smartphone

Do you carry a smartphone or tablet? More than half of us do these days, and with the popularity of TransitTracker, rider apps and mobile ticketing, we’re using our devices on transit more than ever. Here are some tips that can help prevent you from becoming a target for would-be thieves, and help recover your device if it is ever stolen:

1. Set up GPS tracking

Find My iPhone

If your phone or tablet is ever lost or stolen, having GPS tracking enabled can help you (and the police) find it.

If your phone or tablet is lost or stolen, having GPS tracking enabled can help you (and the police) find it. This is a quick, simple and free process for iOS and Android devices that can help police track down the thief.

2. Ride smart

The safest place for your electronic device is out of sight. Here are some safety tips if you use a phone or tablet on board:

  • Always be aware of what is happening around you.
  • Hold your device with both hands to make it more difficult to snatch.
  • Don’t use your device near train doors. Many robberies take place as the doors are closing, allowing the thief to get away.
  • White or red headphone cords are often a telltale sign that you have an expensive device. Consider changing the cord to a less conspicuous color.

3. If your device is stolen…

  • Never resist or chase a thief. No gadget is worth getting hurt!
  • Write down the thief’s description, including any identifying characteristics and clothing.
  • Immediately report to the police by dialing 911 or notify the operator or a TriMet supervisor.
  • Contact your wireless carrier. They can lock or wipe your device remotely, which makes it worthless to the thief.

Make it a priority to “be seen” when you’re out this fall and winter

 

Be seen when it's dark out.

Wear light-colored clothing and add reflective strips to your accessories. “Be seen. Be safe.”

Harry Saporta is TriMet’s safety and security executive.

It’s that time of year when Daylight Saving Time ends, and days become shorter and darker.  I encourage pedestrians and bicyclists to think about increasing visibility in low-light by dressing in light-colored clothing and accessorizing with reflective strips.

How do you improve your visibility when it’s dark? Submit a photo with your “Bright Ideas” and you could win up to $400 in prizes!

When you’re out and about this fall and winter, consider these easy tips to increase your visibility:

  1. Wear reflective outerwear. Drivers can see bicyclists and pedestrians from farther away when they shine. For example, you are first visible to a driver from 500 feet away when you are wearing reflective clothing. Compare this to just 55 feet away when wearing dark colors.
  2. Add more shine. Wear shoes, backpacks, jackets and other clothing with reflective materials. Add reflective tape and strips to your shoes, backpack, purse, bike wheel spokes, jacket sleeves, pant legs—really, anywhere and everywhere! Reflective vests and hats are great as well.
  3. Use lights freely. Before sunrise and after sunset, cyclists are legally required to have a red reflector or light on the back and a white light on the front. Invest in the brightest lights you can afford. But don’t stop there: Headlights, armbands with lights, leg bands with blinking lights, small blinking lights on your coat, purse or backpack… All of these items can  help you be seen whether you’re biking or walking.
  4. Be alert. Even if you are a sparkly beacon of light with legs, as a pedestrian, you should always use crosswalks when available and make eye contact with drivers to make sure they see you. When you’re behind the wheel, be alert and practice extra caution during winter’s rain and low light.

During my more than 31 years as a safety and security professional, I have been reminded time and time again that practicing safe behavior is a shared responsibility. Whether we’re driving, walking or biking, each of us needs to do all we can to be seen and see everyone.

How do you improve your visibility when it’s dark? Submit a photo with your “Bright Ideas” and you could win up to $400 in prizes!

HOW TO: Improve your visibility when it’s dark outside

Corrinna from our on-street customer service team models high-visibility outerwear and reflective strips at Friday's "Be Seen Be Safe" rally at Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Corrinna from our on-street customer service team models high-visibility outerwear and reflective strips at Friday's "Be Seen Be Safe" rally at Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Harry Saporta is TriMet’s safety and security executive.

Now is the time to be seen and see everyone! Darker, shorter days are here and I encourage everyone to stop and think about visibility. It’s the time of year when pedestrians and bicyclists need to “dress” to be seen, and drivers should be especially alert to seeing everyone.

Here are some tips:

  1. Wear reflective outerwear. Drivers can see bicyclists and pedestrians from farther away when they shine. For example, you are first visible to a driver from 500 feet away when you are wearing reflective clothing. Compare this to just 55 feet away when wearing dark colors.
  2. Add more shine. Wear shoes, backpacks, jackets and other clothing with reflective materials. Add reflective tape and strips to your shoes, backpack, purse, bike wheel spokes, jacket sleeves, pant legs—really, anywhere and everywhere! Reflective vests and hats are great as well.
  3. Use lights freely. Before sunrise and after sunset, cyclists are legally required to have a red reflector or light on the back and a white light on the front. Invest in the brightest lights you can afford. But don’t stop there: Headlights, armbands with lights, leg bands with blinking lights, small blinking lights on your coat, purse or backpack… All of these items can  help you be seen whether you’re biking or walking.
  4. Be alert. Even if you are a sparkly beacon of light with legs, as a pedestrian, you should always use crosswalks when available and make eye contact with drivers to make sure they see you. When you’re behind the wheel, be alert and practice extra caution during winter’s rain and low light.

I saw a lot of great examples of these tips last Friday at the “Be Seen Be Safe” rally at Pioneer Courthouse Square. More than 500 people participated, and considerably more were reached via media coverage. TriMet worked for months with many, many partners and volunteers to create and organize the event. Our shared value was prevention. Because safety is everyone’s job, we worked together to convey this important life-saving message.

During my more than 31 years as a safety and security professional, I have been reminded time and time again that practicing safe behavior is a shared responsibility. Whether we’re driving, walking or biking, each of us needs to do all we can to be seen and see everyone.

WEIGH IN ON FACEBOOK: How do you make yourself visible when it’s dark outside?