All posts by Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

Instagram Roundup: March

Congratulations on making it through winter — it was a big one, and you did it in style. Now sun’s out (hello, 75 degrees!), everything’s blooming and the days are quickly getting longer.

Not that you’d need to go outside to know this. A quick glance at Instagram confirms that spring is here — these vibrant scenes are filled with color and life:

Tilikum Illuminated, Series 2/4 (facing East) | #tilikumcrossing #ridetrimet #bridges_aroundtheworld #igers_portland #tilikumilluminated

A photo posted by Amanda Ulrich ✨👟✨ (@amandapdxrunforcongo) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

City kids for a day. #portland #trimet

A photo posted by @mikanmorton on

On the train! Off to the airport!!! #guenbttravels #vegas #onthetrain #trimet #airport #blackandwhite 🚟

A photo posted by gmaher (@guenbtdotcom) on

It’s spring vacation now. バスでお出かけ! #bus#pdx#trimet #springbreak

A photo posted by @miauring on

Portland rain #portlandoregon #pnw #downtown #rain #trimet #oregon #exploreportland #nofilter #lighting

A photo posted by She flies with her own wings (@myemeraldvalley) on

My kind of weather! #desaturated #bridge #broadway #steel #portland #pdx #oregon #fog #foggy #trimet #commute

A photo posted by j.todd (@j.todd.desaturated) on

#Bybee #orangelineproject #nofilter #trimet #portlandmax #goodmorning

A photo posted by @brittany_kay_detarr on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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The 2016 Spring Break Staycation Guide

If you’ve got a break coming up and you’re staying in town, here are some transit-accessible ideas for when…

Image: Picnic House
You could eat at three different restaurants a day during Portland Dining Month and not try them all. Image: Picnic House

You’re hungry: Portland Dining Month

In a city known for embracing food culture, March is the tastiest month. This year, more than 120 restaurants are offering a three course special for $29. Browse the entire list, which spans 24 (!) categories and restaurants citywide. (And don’t think for a second that there’s a shortage of gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options — there’s a checkbox for that.)

Every day in March at 120+ restaurants throughout Portland. portlanddiningmonth.com

You’re thirsty: Spring Beer & Wine Fest

Not only are 39 great, mostly local breweries and wineries exhibiting at this event — there are also cideries, meaderies, distilleries, cheesemakers and chocolatiers. And the fact that it’s indoors means you don’t have to worry about spring showers diluting your drink!

Oh, and get there early if you can: The first 500 in line on Friday get in free!

March 25 & 26 at Oregon Convention Center. springbeerandwinefest.com

 

Portland Saturday Market
Don’t forget: Saturday Market is open Sundays, too.

You’ve got family in town: Saturday Market

This month marks the return of one of Portland’s longest-running events, Saturday Market (it’s on Sundays, too). At its core, the market is an artists’ community that gives visitors — approximately one million each year — a direct connection to the artisans, makers and artists. Within the 250+ craft and food booths everyone in your party is guaranteed to find something they want, love or simply and inexplicably need to have.

Saturdays and Sundays, March through December at North Waterfront Park and Ankeny Plaza. portlandsaturdaymarket.com

You’re feeling nostalgic: Gresham Skate World and The Tiki Putt

In an age where throwbacks reign supreme, this is the real deal — a neighborhood roller rink that’s been open since the mid-70s. There’s even a Spring Break All-Nighter if you think you’ve got what it takes.

Open daily at 1220 NE Kelly Avenue in Gresham. greshamskateworld.com

If your skating skills are suspect, try the nearby mini-golf course at The Tiki Putt. Its 18 holes feature huts, jungles and an active volcano — plus the whole thing is blacklit.

Open daily at 1776 NW Fairview Drive in Gresham. thetikiputt.com

 

Flickr/Portland Japanese Garden
The Strolling Pond is one of many serene spaces at the Portland Japanese Garden. Image: Flickr/Portland Japanese Garden

You need a close-in getaway: Portland Japanese Garden

After a six-month closure to work on an expansion, this local treasure has reopened its doors. It’s been hailed as one of the most authentic Japanese gardens outside of Japan, and a stroll around the grounds (you’ll visit the Natural Garden, Sand and Stone Garden, Flat Garden, Strolling Pond Garden and Tea Garden) makes this abundantly, serenely, beautifully clear.

Open daily in Washington Park. japanesegarden.com

You need a wardrobe update: The Mall

You’ve earned your break, why not treat yourself? Head over to the shop whose Instagrams you’re always liking and see what’s in store. Or go to the mall and surprise yourself (any mall will do, but Washington Square, Clackamas Town Center and Lloyd Center are the biggest). We love spring because it symbolizes a fresh start, and a new outfit pairs well with a new outlook.

 

Train to Plane
We’ll take you right to the terminal.

You’re leaving town: Portland International Airport

It’s been quite a winter. So if your plan is to get far, far away (a week of sun and sand, perhaps) we’ve got you. Skip the parking and catch the train to the plane — MAX Red Line trains arrive at PDX about every 15 minutes during the day.

(We can get you to Amtrak and Union Station, too!)

trimet.org/traintoplane

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Instagram Roundup: February

After a few years in Portland, you become accustomed to the February Fakeout: a string of mild, sunny days that tricks you into thinking spring has begun. But inevitably the rain returns and you realize daylight saving time hasn’t even started.

Even if they don’t last, these days are a good pick-me-up for commuters coming out of a dark, damp winter. For proof, just look at the sun and the blossoms in some of your photos from the last few weeks:

Follow the glow of the distant sun.

A photo posted by Fredo R. (@supfredo) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

Happy Monday! 😊

A photo posted by Penelope The Hedgehog (@hedgiepenelope) on

left intentionally or unintentionally, me gusta 🌸 #pdxblooms #trimetmax

A photo posted by Angelica M. Millán Lozano (@antagoniista) on

Riding the public transit may not be an exciting occurrence for most people, but as a large group of people and dogs board the bus or train, it becomes a lot more interesting. Of course it’s not just for fun, it’s very important for our guide dog puppies to learn how to properly board public transit and sit or lay quietly and calmly while it rumbles along. As a guide dog they will likely utilize buses, trains, or other forms of public transportation with their handler so while they are in training with us we expose them to that experience, often many times, to ensure that they are comfortable and confident doing so. Our puppies had the opportunity to demonstrate just how awesome they are at that on Tuesday when we boarded a bus with ten puppies and headed to the mall for a very big outing (to be announced in the following post). #guidedogsfortheblind #Sightmasters Pictured above is now 14-month-old yellow lab, Ryan, relaxing on a commuter train on a previous club outing. He is laying down on the blue speckled floor, tucked under a seat on a raised step. The edge of the raised area is outlined with a yellow stripe. His paws are hanging over the edge, one hanging down and the other sticking straight out, and he is looking directly at the camera. #ryan

A photo posted by Sightmasters (@sightmasters) on

An aptly placed etching | #tilikumcrossing #pdxsunrise #ridetrimet

A photo posted by Amanda Ulrich ✨👟✨ (@amandapdxrunforcongo) on

| Tilikum #Transitnerdery | #🌉 #🔳 #transitnerd #bridgevibe #igers_portland #portlandnw #pdxavsquad #trimet

A photo posted by G R A N T 🍀 O’C O N N E L L (@ghoconnell) on

Tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to show us your stuff in March!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Four Ways to Celebrate Black History Month

In a smart Slate piece about more thoughtful ways to celebrate Black History Month, Aisha Harris implores readers to do more — to make an effort to learn something new about the black community or experience.

So if you haven’t already, now’s a great time to start. We’ve gathered some ideas below — these upcoming events will broaden your perspective and offer insight into the past, present and future of African-American culture. Each is guaranteed to be engaging and thought-provoking, and all are accessible by transit.

Cascade Festival of African Films

Thursday, Friday and Saturday screenings through March 5 at PCC Cascade Campus’ Moriarty Arts & Humanities Building. Free.

woman

The films being shown this year take on subjects as varied as urban life, gender equality and religious fundamentalism, but the majority of them share a common trait: They were made by African directors. This makes for a great opportunity to explore the continent’s diverse cultures through the lens of first-hand experience.

The festival’s centerpiece film, Run, plays February 19 at 7 p.m. at the Hollywood Theatre. Free.

The festival’s centerpiece film is Run, which takes place in the present-day Ivory Coast. The story reflects on the journey of a man named Run, who is in hiding after assassinating the country’s prime minister. It’s described as “impassioned and poetic…a strong allegory for the people and history of contemporary Ivory Coast.”

Portland Black Film Festival

Through February 27 at the Hollywood Theatre. General admission $8.

Bringing things closer to home, this young film festival focuses on the black experience in America. Seven films will be screened, including A Ballerina’s Tale, the story of prodigal ballerina Misty Copeland, and the only known print of Catch My Soul, a 1974 rock opera treatment of Othello (!).

African American Read-In

February 14 at 2 p.m. at the North Portland Library; Teen Read-In is February 26 at 4 p.m. at the St. Johns Library. Free.

Two Multnomah County Libraries have gathered community leaders, teachers, students and local celebrities to read from their favorite books by black authors — but you can do more than just listen. Everyone will be able to share words from their favorite works, and children and young adults will be able to enjoy special gatherings.

PDX Jazz Fest

February 18–26 at a dozen Portland venues. Tickets for individual shows from $15.

High-Res_Alicia_Olatuja_0937_1600x600b

This festival began 13 years ago as a Black History Month initiative to heighten jazz outreach and education in Portland, and now it’s bringing world-class performances to our city. Jazz is one of America’s most celebrated art forms, with roots in hundreds of years of the black experience — but it’s not all history. What you’ll discover at these shows and talks is that jazz is an ever-evolving medium.

So whether you’re at an intimate club like the iconic Jimmy Mak’s or seated in the Newmark Theater, taking in a tribute to the greats or watching a virtuoso harpist who has recorded with Drake, you’re sure to marvel at how vital jazz really is.


The final point Harris makes in her article is that we need to continue this conversation year-round — not just every February. So after you’ve enjoyed the festivals and events, consider that there is infinitely more to share and learn. There are people to meet, businesses to become acquainted with, books to read and lots of history to consider.

All this is especially important to us as a transit service (as everyone who knows Rosa Parks’ story can attest). We have an ongoing responsibility to steer our legacy toward fairness, understanding and appreciation — that’s what drives our transit equity and diversity work, and why we encourage everyone to celebrate Black History Month.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Instagram Roundup: January

We rang in January with free rides on New Year’s Eve — not long after that came the snow (and lots of it). Our Instagram feed was filled with great shots of wintry commutes, lights and bridges…and pancakes. Here’s a look at some of the photos you shared with us last month:

Pretty pretty in my Bridge City today ❄️ #SnowAtLast

A photo posted by Madison Daisy (@missmadisondaisy) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

#cloudyday crossing #tilikumcrossing #bridge #portland #oregon #pnw #trimet #gooutside

A photo posted by portland oregon based person (@nutsandboltsphoto) on

#commute #trimet #publictransportation #gobytransit #train #tigard #oregon

A photo posted by Sabrina (@fromaway) on

The Tilikum Crossing after OMSI After Dark last weekend, gotta love Portland at night.

A photo posted by Harrison Kistler (@harrisonkistler) on

Mass Transit pt II. . . . #oregon #explore #pdx #portland #pnw #vsco #vscocam #perspective

A photo posted by Jeff Toreson (@jeffsview) on

Beautiful view of @ridetrimet making its way over the Steel Bridge. What a dreamy city! 😍 #downtownPDX #PDX

A photo posted by Downtown Portland (@downtownpdx) on

Street Car Vibes • 008|366 Portland is really transit friendly. |#BrowniesWestCoastWinter

A photo posted by A L E X (@dearmrjack) on

What have you come up with this month? Tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to show us your stuff!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

More Posts

The Year in Review: 2015

Our year has been characterized by success and surprise in equal measure. Everything from fireworks to record rainfall has left an impression upon us, and we’ve learned a little more with each passing event.

And the best part is that we’ve set up 2016 to be a great year.

Scroll down for a look at some of the highlights from the last 12 months, and what you can expect from us in the near future.

We opened the MAX Orange Line and Tilikum Crossing.

The year’s marquee event — not just for us, but for transportation in the Portland region — was the opening of the Orange Line. Our fifth light rail project looked nothing like the others before it, mostly because it included an extraordinary new bridge.

Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, is (say it with me!) the first bridge in the U.S. allowing transit, pedestrians and bikes, but no private vehicles. It’s also a work of art — slender, with clean lines and generous decks — but it was still an incredible surprise to see upwards of 40,000 people celebrating it on Aug. 9 at the People’s Preview.

Just over a month later, after what has to be some of the most genuinely fun fanfare to accompany a transit project (the fireworks mentioned above were just part of the one-of-a-kind series of celebrations), the Orange Line began service. And it became clear what was at the heart of all our anticipation: a forward-thinking solution to getting around the increasingly busy corridor between Portland and Milwaukie.

We added service.

The Orange Line was the biggest addition to our service this year, but it isn’t the only thing we added. We restored frequent service on MAX and 12 bus lines, meaning a train or bus every 15 minutes or better most of the day, every day.

We were thrilled to see the introduction of North Hillsboro Link, a free and flexible shuttle connecting riders to jobs, schools, community services and events. It complements Ride Connection’s other shuttles in Tualatin and Forest Grove.

There’s more on the way, too. Many of the other plans you’ve helped us shape in our Future of Transit project will be funded thanks to the additional revenue coming from the recent employer payroll tax increase. Employers pay for the majority of our operating revenue, and this increase of 1/10th of one percent (phased in over 10 years) will go toward more service, better frequency and new connections. And you won’t have to wait long to see more service — we’ve already planned the introduction of bus Line 97-Tualatin/Sherwood this summer.

We got new buses and trains.

Our plans for enhanced service also called for more vehicles, and this year we made some interesting additions to our bus and rail fleet. What we didn’t get: more of the same. In early spring we brought in the first of 22 30-foot buses, which are smaller and handle better on routes with tight turns.

Then came the fifth-generation (Type 5) MAX vehicles, which feature more and better seats (with more legroom), better ramps and a better air conditioning system than previous models. These improvements were partially the result of rider and operator feedback. (Interestingly, the seating layout and ramp design ended up resembling those of our second and third generation trains.)

Finally, we introduced the confusingly-named but fantastically clean-running all-electric hybrids — buses that can be completely electrically powered, which our older hybrids can’t do. They’re quiet, get good gas mileage (at least 6 miles per gallon, impressive for a bus) and they’ll save plenty in fuel costs over their lifetime.

We started developing Hop Fastpass.

We’re joining the ranks of transit districts with electronic fare systems, and if you’ve ever used contactless fares like ORCA or Clipper, you probably understand why this is a big deal.

hop_bg

Hop Fastpass, our regional e-fare system, makes its debut in 2017. You’ll be able to ride cash-free and paperless — no more searching for change or keeping track of tickets — and you’ll even be able to set up automatic balance reloading so you’re never stuck without fare.

And if you’re a frequent rider you can pay your way toward a monthly pass, one ride at a time. After using Hop Fastpass to pay for 20 day passes in one month, you’ll ride free until the next month. It’s a convenient way to get the value of a monthly pass without the upfront cost, and you’ll never pay for rides you don’t use.

We contended with weather.

MAX is designed to operate best within our region’s average temperature range — but as we all know, this year hasn’t been average. It was the hottest summer on record in the Northwest, and at its peak MAX had to slow down in case it came across anything amiss (sun-kinked rails, sagging power wires). Of course, slower trains cause delays, which are even less fun when it’s 100 degrees out.

(Speaking of the heat: As of last week, all our buses have been equipped with air conditioning — doesn’t mean much now, but we’ll be that much more comfortable next summer!)

Then came the rain. By Halloween, the combination of torrential downpours and clogged storm drains across the region made streets into rivers — including the MAX tracks below the Morrison Bridge. It was there that we made a fateful error and drove a train through standing water, which entered the cab (we were glad nobody was hurt) and damaged the vehicle’s undercarriage.

While our mechanics diligently inspected and repaired the water damage, we were stuck sending out single-car MAX trains. After the regrettable endeavor, we vowed to use our common sense next time.

We had some service issues.

Our troubles didn’t end with the weather. This year saw some persistent switch and signal issues cause recurring delays for MAX riders.  You deserve more reliable and efficient service than we often delivered, and we’re truly sorry about that.

fix

Whether it’s a known issue (like problem switches), ongoing work (like train rehab and maintenance) or something that just comes up, know that we’re doing everything we can to fix it. Designing better equipment (new switches are coming next year); improving and retrofitting our oldest trains (we’ve only got a couple more to go); working vigilantly to keep things running in the worst weather.

There will be some tough weeks next year while we dig in and do the remodeling, but we promise you a more reliable ride when it’s done.

We connected with you in new ways.

Through it all, we enjoyed connecting with you this year. We engaged more on Twitter and Facebook, which let us provide more useful information but more importantly made us better listeners.

We also found some extraordinary new ways to keep in touch:

Sharing an only-on-transit moment on Instagram. Sharing an Orange Line IPA at BridgePort. Handing out Tilikum Crossing scarves during a historic Timbers season. Parading lit-up bikes through the night in the rain. We did a lot this year, and you were right there with us.

We learned a ton.

The point of looking back at the events that shaped our year isn’t simply to reminisce. More importantly, processing these experiences and hearing what worked for you (and what didn’t) helps us think of ways we can do better in the future, starting now.  We’ll capitalize on our successes and learn from the mistakes, and keep the focus on improving  your ride — because we really believe that’s what’s most important.

We can’t wait to show you more in 2016. Thanks for riding.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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2015 Holiday Events Guide

Who doesn’t love November? Sure, the brisk weather and short days can catch us off guard. But once we get past that, our holiday spirit begins to surface as we come together for food, family and festivals.

Here are 10 upcoming celebrations to get you started:

Macy’s Holiday Parade

Friday, Nov. 27 at 9 a.m.
Downtown Portland

Shake off your post-stuffing stupor with a morning of grand floats, costumed characters (nearly 500 of them!) and local marching bands parading through Downtown.

Tree Lighting Ceremony

Friday, Nov. 27 at 5:30 p.m.
Pioneer Courthouse Square

There’s a 75-foot tree in the middle of Pioneer Courthouse Square — you may have seen it — waiting to be lit for the holidays. As part of the ceremony, Thomas Lauderdale will lead members of Pink Martini, the Pacific Youth Choir, The von Trapps, and thousands of onlookers in a holiday sing-a-long. Come prepared: Download a copy of the songbook here.

ZooLights

ZooLights

Friday, Nov. 27 through Sunday, Jan. 3
5–9 p.m.
5–8 p.m. on Value Nights
Oregon Zoo

There are 1.5 million lights on display at the Oregon Zoo’s annual winter festival, but that’s only one reason it’s so popular. This year, think “train” when you go to ZooLights — there’s a special Zoo Railway loop you won’t want to miss, plus big savings for anyone who takes MAX to the event.

Tip: The Sunset Transit Center Park & Ride often fills up on Blazers game nights — consider using a different lot if you’re planning to visit those evenings.

Holiday Ale Festival

Wednesday, Dec. 2–Sunday, Dec. 6
11 a.m.–10 p.m. most nights
Pioneer Courthouse Square

What would an events guide be without a beer festival? Keep warm by sampling more than 50 exclusive and rare brews, from Belgians to barleywines to porters and stouts. Keep your phone handy when you’re there, because the mobile version of the festival’s site will have up-to-the-second updates on beer tappings and locations.

Christmas Ships

Christmas Ships

Friday, Dec. 4–Sunday, Dec. 20
Parade on the Willamette and Columbia rivers, starting most nights at RiverPlace Marina

The first Christmas Ship sailed solo from the Portland Yacht Club back in 1954; now, nearly 60 boats light up the Willamette and Columbia rivers in what’s become a grand Portland tradition. If you’re taking in the spectacle this year, be sure to track the fleet on Twitter. And if you’re looking for a new vantage point, may we suggest Tilikum Crossing?

First Night at Director Park

Sunday, Dec. 6 at 4 p.m.
Director Park

This year’s celebration of the first night of Chanukah features a special ice menorah (ice menorah!), music, latkes and activities for kids. It’s a community collaboration between Chabad of Oregon, the American Red Cross and Portland Fire & Rescue — pitch in by bringing travel-size toiletries to be given to VA Hospitals and Stand Downs, events providing supplies and services to homeless veterans.

Super Colossal Holiday Sale

Saturday, Dec. 12–Sunday, Dec. 13
11 a.m.–6 p.m.
Oregon Convention Center

Need to get gifts for your sister, grandfather, boss, best friend, neighbor, et cetera?

Try Crafty Wonderland’s Super Colossal Holiday Sale — you won’t be disappointed. With 60,000 square feet of handmade gifts, goodies, art and crafts from Northwest artisans (and beyond!), this is your one-stop holiday shop.

Portland Posada & Holiday Bazaar

Posada: Saturday, Dec. 12 at 10 a.m.
Holiday Bazaar: Saturday Dec. 12–Sunday, Dec. 20
Portland Mercado

Looking for something a little smaller than the Super Colossal sale, and with great food? Head to the Portland Mercado for the inaugural Portland Posada, an all-day craft fair with specialty food and drinks, a gift drive and musical performances.

What makes Posada even more special is that it’s tied to Latin American holiday traditions, and that it celebrates philanthropy and creative entrepreneurship. Plus, it marks the kickoff of the Holiday Bazaar, a nine-day pop-up gift shop in the heart of the Mercado.

Winter Village

Friday, Dec. 18–Sunday, Jan. 3
10 a.m.–10 p.m.
Orenco Station Plaza

Be the first to take the ice at the Winter Village, an open-air ice skating experience making its debut at the Orenco Station Plaza. Hop on MAX and you’ll be at the rink in no time — this one’s right across from the Orenco/NW 231st Ave Station!

Portland Winter Light Festival

Portland Winter Light Festival

Wednesday, Feb. 3–Sunday, Feb. 7
5–11 p.m.
OMSI

In the bleak midwinter, a light! Or, actually, large-scale light sculptures, projections, performances, installations, from a dozen world-class artists. Taking cues from light festivals around the globe, the inaugural Portland Winter Light Festival aims to bring people together during a time of year typically reserved for the indoors.

Who couldn’t use an inspiring spectacle to celebrate light, life and warmth in February? Bundle up!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

More Posts

Alternatives to the MAX Orange Line Park & Rides

Commuters parking in nearby neighborhoods was never a big issue following the opening of previous MAX lines. But since the Orange Line opened in September, we’ve seen its two Park & Rides fill up quickly on weekday mornings, leading some drivers to find spots along residential streets.

The Park & Ride at the SE Park Ave MAX Station has quickly proven popular.
The Park & Ride at the SE Park Ave MAX Station has quickly proven popular.

It’s not that we didn’t want to offer more parking. After all, more commuters using a Park & Ride means more riders — and that’s a good thing! But faced with reducing the scope of the Orange Line project after federal funding was reduced from 60 percent to half, we decided to limit the size of the Park & Rides (while laying foundation for future expansion) and try our best to secure the funding later. This was just one of many cuts we had to make; unfortunately, even after the new line came in under budget, the Federal Transportation Administration didn’t allow these deferred items to be added back to the project.

(There’s a chance the savings will be returned to us — along with our local partners — in 2019, when the last phase of the project concludes.)

So while we anticipated that the Park & Rides would be popular, we also hoped the excellent network of bike routes, trails and transit connecting to the Orange Line would mitigate problems with packed parking garages. If you’re an Orange Line Park & Ride user, consider the following as ways to potentially save time, money and sanity.

Bike there (or walk!)
There are Bike & Rides at the Tacoma and Park Ave stations with plenty of secure and enclosed parking. Plus, both facilities are connected to great off-street trails (the Springwater Corridor and the Trolley Trail, respectively) and bike-friendly roads. Many bike commuters ride year-round; if you’re thinking of getting started now, check out the Community Cycling Center’s tips for riding in the rain.

There are a total of 146 secure and enclosed bike parking spaces at Orange Line Bike & Rides.
There are a total of 146 secure and enclosed bike parking spaces at Orange Line Bike & Rides.

Connect
Many buses serve Orange Line stations, either directly or via a nearby stop. For example, there are eight lines that stop at SE 21st & Jackson in Milwaukie, less than a quarter-mile from the Milwaukie/Main St Station. Try planning a trip to see how you can connect to MAX.

An alternate Park & Ride
The Milwaukie Park & Ride connects to the Orange Line via Line 34 — a quick one-mile trip will get you to MAX and on your way. Walking’s an option, too, and a great way to get fresh air and exercise before starting your day. And don’t forget: During commute hours, Line 99 will take you all the way into Downtown Portland.

Carpool
Chances are a neighbor or coworker is headed the same way you are. Give carpooling a try and better your chances at getting a spot at the Park & Ride.

The Trolley Trail runs six miles between Gladstone and Milwaukie and connects to the SE Park Ave MAX Station.
The Trolley Trail runs six miles between Gladstone and Milwaukie and connects to the SE Park Ave MAX Station.

Be considerate if you park in the neighborhood
If you miss out on a spot at the Park & Ride and decide to park on a nearby residential street, keep it legal and be courteous. Please respect private property and don’t park in nearby lots. There are parking ordinances that apply (check out this helpful list from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office) and, just as importantly, neighbors’ feelings to consider. Neglecting these could earn you a costly citation or a nasty note.

The Orange Line has been successful because riders were willing to try something new. Changing our routines isn’t easy, but it often leads us to discover some great benefits, both for ourselves and our community. In that spirit, why not see if there’s a better option for your next commute?

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

More Posts

Light Parade Group Bike Ride [VIDEO]

Last night, the Light Parade Group Bike Ride lit up Pioneer Courthouse Square and Base Camp Brewing. We saw lots of smiles, plenty of cool bikes and all kinds of lights and reflectors. As we proceeded over Tilikum Crossing, through the cold and dark, we showed that riding safely and comfortably isn’t a chore. It can actually be fun!

Thanks to everyone who joined us — it was great to see you. (Get it?)

We lit up Pioneer Courthouse Square and Base Camp Brewing Company last night! 󾟫✨Thank you to everyone that came out—It was great to SEE you!For tips on dressing bright morning and night check out trimet.org/beseen.

Posted by TriMet on Thursday, November 12, 2015

 

Also, thanks to our friends from the Bicycle Transportation Alliance for helping us out and leading the ride, and to North St Bags, REI, Portland Juice Co. and A Better Cycle for bringing the party.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Commemorating Back to the Future Day

TriMet to the Future

Marty McFly and Doc Brown traveled through time to October 21, 2015 in Back to the Future Part II. When they arrived they were greeted by flying cars, hoverboards and sneakers that tied themselves. And, stretching the limits of the imagination, the Cubs won the World Series.

“Where we’re going, we don’t need roads.” – Emmett Lathrop “Doc” Brown, Ph.D

While we still have a ways to go before living up to 1989’s dream of the future, it’s fun to think about the progress we have made. So when the opportunity arose to commemorate #backtothefutureday, we had to do it — thanks to PDX-DMC and the Pacific Northwest DeLorean Club for the assist!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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