All posts by Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

TriMetiquette: You told us what makes you cringe on board

Back in February, we asked for feedback about which transit etiquette, or “TriMetiquette,” rules riders should follow. Well, the results are in!

After sorting through 1,071 responses of what bugs you while you ride, we’ve narrowed it down to three TriMetiquette sub-categories: Noise, Gross and Space.

noise_header

About 45% of the responses mentioned annoyances involving noise. Two hundred and seventy-seven responses were about people talking too loud while on board (“Speakerphone is not for the bus!”), and about 207 replies referenced riders playing music or games too loudly on their personal devices.

“Turn your music down, we can all hear it coming from the headphones and it sounds awful. Keep your voice down during both face-to-face and phone conversations—if the phone connection is poor, call them later—we don’t want to listen to you yell into thin air.”

gross_header

This sub-category covers a range of pet peeves including feet on seats and smoking (“People always ignore the non-smoking signs and smoke right next to passengers”) to odd smells (“Bathe, for the love of all that’s holy, and not in Axe.”) and offensive personal grooming habits (“No cleaning your ears or clipping your fingernails on the bus”).  Overall, 51% of the received feedback fell into this category—164 replies were specifically about feet and dirty shoes on seats.

“No feet on the seats! I think that feet on the seats is unclean, gross and it makes it difficult for other people who really need a seat (when the bus or train is full).”

space_header

Leading the way with a whopping 639 replies and 60% of the responses were frustrations about space. Riders really can’t stand seeing other riders take up more than one seat (“One butt, one seat”), stand too close for comfort (“Please do your best not to lean on your fellow passengers”), exit the bus from the front (“Remember, exiting by the front door keeps everyone waiting“), or hop on the train before letting others off.

“Stop blocking the door when people are trying to get off the MAX.  Stand back and let people exit before getting on.”

But the pet peeves don’t stop there—we also received plenty of feedback about practicing common courtesy, like giving up your seat to seniors, people with disabilities or others who could really use is, and covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze

We want you to have an enjoyable ride, but that can’t happen without your help. So, let’s be considerate to one another, use headphones while we ride, keep our belongings  on the floor and our feet off the seats!

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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We’re rolling out service improvements again!

Spring service changes are just around the corner!—Starting March 1, we’re improving bus service on 18 lines with a focus on matching schedules to traffic conditions, relieving crowding and reducing wait and transfer times.

  • frequent-serviceImproved Frequent Service: All our Frequent Service bus lines will have 15-minute (or better) service most of the day on Saturday.
  • Better schedule reliability: We’re adjusting the schedules of nine lines to match service with daily traffic conditions.
  • Efficient transfers at Tigard TC: We moved around bus stops for lines 12, 45, 64 and 76/78 at the Tigard Transit Center to better coordinate bus arrivals and departures, meaning a smoother and safer ride for you!

We know you want more and better service. That’s why, over the next few years, we’re working to grow our network of buses and trains—while improving your overall experience on board.

Check the new schedules before heading out. (And don’t forget!—Transfer times increase to 2½ hours on March 1, too!)

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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Starting March 1, tickets will be valid for 2½ hours

2.5 hour ticketIf you normally buy tickets to get around on TriMet, we have some good news! Effective Sunday, March 1, we’re increasing transfer times to 2½ hours. With more time on your ticket, you’ll be able to go more places and get more done.

This change will benefit everyone, but especially our riders who depend solely on transit to get around.

A few years ago a community advocacy group proposed increasing transfer times,  but we couldn’t pursue the change at that time as we were facing budget shortfalls caused by the recession.

The new 2½-Hour Ticket debuts the same day we introduce improved bus service on 18 lines, including some of our Frequent Service lines.

Learn more about how we’re making transit better.

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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Set yourself up for a happy, healthy year—We can help!

A new year can inspire us to set resolutions and make better choices. Here are just a few ways transit can help you achieve a healthier, happier lifestyle and a cleaner environment.

Want to improve your health this year? Try taking public transportation!

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recommend that adults average at least 22 minutes of daily moderate physical activity, such as walking, to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation

Incorporating transit into your commute encourages you to walk or bike as part of your daily routine. TriMet ridership studies show that bus riders will walk as much as a quarter mile to their bus stop, while MAX riders will walk up to a half mile to connect to light rail.

Watching your figure? Transit helps with that, too.

walk
According to the Federal Transit Administration, light rail commuters are 80% less likely to become obese over time, and studies have found that men who commute to work on public transportation are 44.6% less likely to be overweight or obese because they are more active.

Become more zen this year: Public transportation reduces stress.

zenThe average American driver can spend up to 450 hours each year behind the wheel, resulting in rising levels of frustration and stress that can really take a toll on one’s health and quality of life. Transit provides riders with the opportunity to relax—something not available to drivers stranded in traffic.

Clean the air with transit.

cloudMore than four tons of pollutants are avoided every day when people choose to ride TriMet instead of drive cars. Electric-powered transit such as MAX Light Rail and Portland Streetcar, along with our clean-running diesel buses, make transit a benefit to public health and help us all breathe easier.

Learn more about the health benefits of public transportation.

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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How Tilikum Crossing lights up the night

You’ve probably been bombarded with status updates and photo galleries of the new lighting system on the Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People. We just finished our second lighting trial where the artist fine-tuned the color and motion program and its relation to the Willamette River’s activity.

Sadly, the lights will not be turned on permanently until September 2015, when the new MAX Orange Line opens. So until then, here are some interesting tidbits of information about the lights to hold you over.

  • The lighting system was created by San Francisco artist Douglas Hollis and his wife, the late Anna Valentina Murch, for the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project’s Public Art Program.
  • There are 178 LED lights aesthetically placed on 40 bridge cables, the four transmission towers above and below the deck, and on the Sonic Dish artwork along the Eastside Esplanade and future Willamette Greenway at the ends of the bridge.
  • The lights change colors based on the Willamette River’s speed, height and water temperature.
  • This data is collected by a U.S. Geological Survey river monitor near the Morrison Bridge.
  • Specialized software designed by programmer Morgan Barnard takes that data and translates it into movements of color and light across the bridge.
  • The water temperature determines the base color.
  • The river’s speed controls the pace the colors change and move across the bridge.
  • The river’s height is displayed by a second color that moves vertically up and down the towers and the cables.

Learn more about the MAX Orange Line, opening in September 2015!

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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10 must-do events for the Ho-Ho-holidays!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, so get into the holiday spirit without the hassle of traffic, parking and gas! Gather up your friends and family, purchase some 1-Day Passes and let us take you to these holiday events in the Portland-Metro area.


Santaland at Macy’s

November 28 – December 24
Stop by Macy’s in Downtown Portland and meet Santa! You’ll find him on Level A. Don’t forget to have your photo taken with Jolly Old Saint Nicholas, and check out the restored original monorail next to the train garden.

Zoo Lights at the Oregon Zoo.ZooLights at the Oregon Zoo

November 28 – January 4, 2015
You don’t want to miss the zoo’s annual winter festival. This year, experience a new train route through a never-before-seen light experience!

Holiday Ale Festival at Pioneer Courthouse Square

December 3 – 7, opens at 11 a.m.
Toast to the spirits of the season! The Holiday Ale Fest features more than 50 winter ales you won’t find in the supermarket. (Sorry! No one under the age of 21 is allowed to attend.)

America’s Largest Christmas Bazaar at the Expo Center

December 5 – 7, opens at 10 a.m.
Since 1982, the Christmas Bazaar has been considered both a holiday tradition and great place to shop for holiday gifts.

Christmas Ships Parade

December 5 – 20
This year marks the 60th anniversary of Portland’s Christmas Ships Parade on the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. The first run will begin at 7 p.m. on December 5th down North Portland Harbor on the inside of Hayden Island.

TGrottoFOLchapel1he Grotto’s Christmas Festival of Lights

November 28 – December 30
With over 500,000 lights, 150 choral performances, a petting zoo, carolers, puppet shows and hot chocolate, this special event is sure to be a holiday treat for the entire family.

Super Colossal Holiday Sale at the Oregon Convention Center

December 13 – 14, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
More than 250 artists and crafters will be selling their handmade goods during this holiday shopping event. The first 150 shoppers will receive goodie bags on both days—don’t miss out!

Portland Menorah Lighting at Director Park

December 16 – December 23, 5:30 p.m.
Join Chabad of Oregon at Director Park for the annual Portland Menorah Lighting ceremonies. Take part in post-lighting dancing, latkes and apple sauce on December 16th.

The Lights on Peacock Lane

December 15 – December 31, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. (except 12/24 and 12/31, runs to midnight)
Houses in this Southeast Portland neighborhood have been decorating for Christmas since the 1920s. Don’t miss this Rose City tradition—you’ll find Peacock Lane between SE Stark Street and SE Belmont Street, one block east of SE 39th Street.

Celebrate Kwanzaa at the North Portland Library

December 27, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Each day of Kwanzaa recognizes a different value or principle. On December 27, Ujima, the third day, highlights the value of collective work and responsibility.


Don’t miss these opportunities to get into the spirit of the season—we’ll take you there!

Plan your trip at trimet.org

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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