All posts by Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

How do you become a bus operator?

There are lots of reasons why people drive for TriMet. 

Some are attracted by the pay and others by the great benefits. For many, it’s a stable job with opportunities to grow. More still don’t want to be cooped up in an office all day and would rather see the city and interact with people. For most, it’s a combination of all these.

No matter what the motivation, the process of becoming a TriMet bus operator is the same. Here’s what you can expect.

Application

Several times per week, Operations Recruiter Chartisha Roberts reviews online applications. While a consistent work history is important, two things make an application stand out. First is a professional driving history. This is valued but not a requirement. Second is a background in customer service. It’s easier to teach somebody how to drive a bus than it is how to interact with people in a professional and respectful manner.

If your application passes the initial review, Chartisha orders your driving records — a safe driving history is a must — and asks for verification of your high school diploma or GED. About half our operators have a college degree, even though it’s not required for the role, estimates Chartisha. 

Orientation and Group Interview

If your education and driving history check out, you’re invited to an orientation and testing session that’s offered twice a week. For the first hour, Chartisha will walk you through the role. Then you’ll have three pre-employment tests to complete. Two of them are video tests featuring scenarios that could happen on a bus; we want people who are helpful and aware of their surroundings. The third test is a personality assessment that helps us identify safety-minded people with the right disposition for operating a bus in a busy city.

You could get this far in the process within a week of applying

Each orientation is attended by 5 and 12 applicants. Sometimes everybody passes and moves on, but usually we’ll lose a couple people. Those who do pass are invited back to a group panel interview. These interviews happen every Thursday and take about 90 minutes. If an applicant is motivated, they could get this far in the process within a week of applying.

Background check and CDL permit

Those who pass the group interview are invited back to complete paperwork and get fingerprinted for a background check. You’ll also need to go to the DMV to get your CDL learner’s permit (if you don’t already have a one, or a CDL) and visit our doctor to make sure you’re medically fit for the job. We’ll also check your references — three from supervisors and two from co-workers — and conduct drug screenings. Even though we have tolerant laws and attitudes towards many substances in Oregon, you must be able to pass a drug test to be hired as a bus operator.

Training

If everything checks out — congrats! You’ve got an offer to drive for us. You’ll now join a class of 22 new hires for paid training — $15.16 an hour. Five days a week for the next six weeks you’ll be in the classroom, a simulator and (primarily) on the road learning how to be a bus operator. 

After the six weeks of training, you’ll need to pass the CDL test with the DMV. We’ll pay for your test and you have two chances to pass. Training completed and license in hand, you’ll become a part-time bus operator working 30 hours per week. You’ll get an immediate raise to $17.16 an hour, with guaranteed raises every four months for the next three years.

After training, you’ll get an immediate raise to $17.16 an hour

During your 6 month probationary period, your training class will meet monthly. Expect a welcoming environment, a benefit of our hiring friendly people with strong social skills.

Want to work full-time?

Every operator starts part-time with TriMet, but you should have the opportunity to go full time after a month or two. And if you want to become a rail operator, you can apply as soon as your probationary period is over.

It takes some effort, but in the end you’ll have a job you can stay this about:

Sound interesting? Join us as a bus operator!




Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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The Cheapest / Easiest / Most Convenient Ways to Get to PDX

Unlike most cities, we don’t dread going to our airport. The legit food options, reasonable prices and pleasant atmosphere make a big difference, but it also helps that PDX is not a painful haul to get to.

Nearly the entire region is within an hour drive of the airport and many of us live within 30 minutes. Better yet, transit offers an easy one-seat ride from downtown Portland (and beyond) right to the main airport building. Compared to many cities, we have it good.

Still, you have a variety of options for getting to and from our airport. Here are the pros and cons of each and what you can expect to pay.

Best Bets

TRANSIT

The cheapest option by far is quite convenient for many

MAX Red Line offers a one-seat ride to the airport all the way to Beaverton. It’s only 40 minutes from Pioneer Square and all but two of our Frequent Service bus lines (lines where buses arrive every 15 minutes or better most of the day, every day) connect with MAX Red Line.

Trains depart outside of baggage claim every 15 minutes from just before 6 a.m. through about 10 p.m. The first train of the day leaves PDX at 4:56 a.m. and the last departs at 1:41 a.m. (headways may be longer before 6 a.m. and after 10 p.m.).

Departing early or late? When MAX Red Line isn’t running, the PDX Night Bus (Line 272) is; it departs and arrives at PDX every hour.

FYI: Leaving your car in a Park & Ride and taking MAX to the airport is not an option — you can only leave your car at a Park and Ride for up to 24 hours.

Transit will cost $2.50 each way, which is less than the airport surcharge that will be added on top of your Uber or Lyft fare.

UBER / LYFT

Convenient and usually less expensive than driving

There’s a reason why Uber and Lyft have exploded in popularity for airport trips.

That’s not to say they’re cheap — every ride to or from Portland International Airport comes with a $3 surcharge on top of your normal fare. And depending on how far from PDX you live, your fare could be sizable.

Fighting through the rideshare scrum to find your ride as you depart the airport can be a stressful and frustrating experience. But compared to the other options, this is the most convenient and comfortable way to and from the airport.

DRIVING

Expensive but (mostly) convenient

If you have a car, driving to PDX can be a convenient but potentially pricey option.

You have four parking options at PDX, ranging from $12/day up to $35/day:

The Economy lot ($12/day) is the cheapest, but naturally it’s farthest from the concourses. It’s located between Cascade Station and Marine Drive. Shuttle buses run from the lot to the terminal every 7-9 minutes from 4 a.m. to midnight, and every 15 minutes from midnight to 4 a.m.

The Long-Term garage is covered and is located adjacent to the main airport building. It’s the eastern-most garage you’ll see at PDX, and is located immediately behind the air traffic control tower. It costs $24/day.

Short-Term parking is the first garage you see when you walk out of baggage claim (it’s also where the car rental companies operate out of). It’s $27/day.

Feeling fancy (or just don’t want to deal with parking lots)? Valet parking is $35/day. Drop off is on the outer lane of the departure level.

More info about parking options at PDX.

Solid Options

TAXIS

You can catch a taxi from the center island of the roadway outside of departures. Radio Cab will charge you $33.50 to any Downtown location with their coupon.

PRIVATE SHUTTLES

Blue Star (sadly not the makers of delicious donuts) has a regularly scheduled Downtown Express between PDX, Lloyd Center and downtown Portland. It runs every 30 minutes and costs $14 one way ($24 round trip). See schedules and stops.

PRIVATE PARKING LOTS

There are several private parking lots near the airport that offer shuttle services. They offer prices comparable to PDX’s Economy lot.

AirPark
Park N Fly
Thrifty

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Peacock Lane Travel Game Plan

Holiday season is here, which means the popular Peacock Lane Christmas displays are back. Increasingly, the only thing more impressive than the lights are the traffic backups. This is especially true during the times when Peacock Lane is pedestrian-only (December 15-17 this year).

Without planning ahead, what was supposed to be a fun family tradition could result in an extended stay in barely-moving traffic and (endless?) circling through dark and narrow SE Portland streets looking for parking.

But you’ve got options and some are definitely going to result in a better experience than others. Here’s your travel game plan:

BIKING:

Great for some

If you’re comfortable with riding in the dark (and your visibility game is strong), biking is a great way to sidestep the parking problems and traffic backups.

From the east and west, Salmon and Taylor streets bike lanes will get you there, while the 41st Street bike lane is your north-south route.

Heads up: you’ll have to walk your bike on Peacock Lane.

TRANSIT:

Your best bet

You have a lot of options that will drop you on the figurative doorstep of Peacock Lane.

From the east or west, Line 15 is a Frequent Service line that runs down Belmont and will drop you off right at Peacock Lane. Six blocks to the south on Hawthorne is the Frequent Service Line 14 and six blocks to the north on Burnside is Line 20

From the north or south, Line 75 runs down Cesar Chavez, one block from Peacock Lane. Hollywood Transit Center provides a connection to MAX Red, Blue and Green lines and is eight minutes from from Peacock Lane via Line 75.

If you’re coming from farther way, driving to a Park and Ride and then taking MAX + Line 75 the rest of the way is a good bet. By the evening, Park and Ride parking spots are plentiful.

Plan a trip to Peacock Lane on transit

 

DRIVING:

Doable if you don’t mind a long walk

Pick your poison: sit in traffic and fight for parking on those tight streets crowded with pedestrians, or park a ways off and walk 10+ minutes. If it’s especially crowded (and when is it not?), you’re likely to do both.

If you do prefer to drive, you can do a few things to minimize the pain. First, avoid Stark and Belmont for a good 5 blocks in either direction, as well as Cesar Chavez approaching both streets.

Finding a spot within five blocks of Peacock Lane is going to involve a lot of circling and some luck. Parking is usually easier near (or better yet, south of) Hawthorne. The same holds true as you approach Burnside. Going west of Cesar Chavez is also a good idea. Take care crossing over Cesar Chavez; the sidewalks are narrow and the traffic constant.

Oh, and don’t even think about parking at the Walgreens on Belmont. It’s very much a no-go.

Uber / Lyft:

Potentially pricey but better than driving

You won’t avoid the traffic but you will sidestep the parking problems. If you’re able, bypass the stand-still traffic on Stark and Belmont and get dropped off on Burnside or Hawthorne. You’ll have a 5-10 minute walk to Peacock Lane, but you’ll avoid sitting for even longer in traffic (with the meter running).

One more thing: you’re almost certain to run into some major surge pricing when you head home. Try walking a few blocks away to see if you can get out of the surging area.

Have any tips for a painless trip to Peacock Lane? Tweet them to @trimet.

Sign up for Riders Club to get access to more travel tips, fun events and cool giveaways. ➫

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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How We’re Speeding Up Buses

Sometimes a small change in our roads can have a big impact on how fast we all get home.

Recently, we’ve been working with PBOT and ODOT to improve intersections where buses (and cars) frequently get stuck in traffic. Here’s what we did at SW 4th Avenue and Harrison in Portland:

Before we worked with PBOT to tweak this intersection, left-turning cars would block buses from continuing east towards Naito. Just one turning car could cause delays to the buses that travel this busy corridor — including lines 35, 36, 54, 56 and 99.

But we saw an easy fix: Create a turn lane for eastbound traffic. Now, turning cars don’t block traffic. In the months since PBOT made this change, delays during the afternoon rush hour on those lines have dropped by nearly 20%. Small change, big impact.

We’ve worked with our partners to roll out similar improvements at nine other places across the region, from SE Stark at 82nd, to NE Holman at Airport Way, to the westbound approaches to the Hawthorne Bridge, and more. And there are dozens more intersections that we think can be improved. Think of these as the “low-hanging fruit” for speeding up buses and cars around our region.

This is just one small way we’re working to make transit — and the Portland region — better.          

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Watch: What happens behind the scenes during a MAX disruption?

What’s happening on the ground when MAX stops running and our construction crews descend on a section of track?

Lots, it turns out. Let’s look at one stretch of tracks between SW Adams and S 1st during our recent Hillsboro MAX improvement project.

In the weeks before the disruption started, we removed most of the concrete around the rails. While the exposed rails — also known by the Halloween-appropriate term “skeleton rails” — look dangerous, they’re safe to run trains over.

Once the disruption started, we were able to cut the rails out.

With the rails gone, we were left with a shallow empty pit.

From there we laid the new rails and switches…

…welded them together and secured them to the ground.

We poured the new concrete…

…and then we ran test trains to make sure the new switches and rails were safe.

Here’s a time lapse covering the time from the last train before the disruption until the first test train going over the new rails.

This was far from the only work we did the past two weeks. It was a lot to accomplish and we couldn’t have done it without your patience!

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Buses to the Rescue

If you need buses, and you need buses fast, Alex Ubiadas is who you call.

Whether you need to quickly evacuate a large number of people, like during 2017’s Eagle Creek Fire in the Columbia Gorge, or you need a space to warm up first responders during a winter emergency, TriMet’s Emergency Manager is the person who can make it happen.

“We’re the only people in the area who can move lots of people in a short period of time,” says Alex, “This is not our primary mission, but as a taxpayer-funded public agency, we believe this an important role for us to play in our community.”

When something bad happens, people across the region know to contact Alex directly. If it’s a valid public emergency, and there are extra buses and operators available, he’ll coordinate with TriMet’s Operations Command Center to make sure the buses get where they need to go.

A common misconception is that the buses and operators being used for emergencies are being pulled off their regular runs, with TriMet’s service suffering as a result. “We always have extra buses and operators standing by in case of any issues, like if we need to replace MAX with shuttle buses, or a bus breaks down, or an operator calls in sick,” explains Alex. “As a last resort, we’ll pull some buses off Frequent Service lines to replace MAX during lengthy disruptions. But we only use our spare buses and drivers for responding to emergencies.”

Water and other supplies for Eagle Creek Fire evacuees

2017’s Eagle Creek Fire was one of the largest — and farthest flung — emergency operations Alex has helped coordinate. As the fire raced through the Gorge, thousands of residents needed to be evacuated. Even though the evacuation zones extended far beyond TriMet’s service area, several buses were sent to help shuttle people to shelters and to bring water and other supplies to the evacuees. “Because the fire moved so quickly, we only had a couple hours heads-up on that request. With the amount of people we transported and the distance from Portland, it was our largest emergency operation in recent memory.”

TriMet has also recently provided buses that helped evacuate people during the 2018 junkyard fire off NE Killingsworth Street. And in 2016, TriMet buses took children from their school near the NW 23rd Avenue gas explosion to a safe location where their parents could pick them up.

Beyond evacuations, TriMet will provide buses to help police departments with transportation when a large number of people have been arrested, such as during a riot. Alex will also help arrange for warming or cooling buses. “If there is a fire during the winter months, we’ll often provide a bus for firefighters to rest and warm themselves. Likewise, in extreme heat, we can provide buses to help cool first responders or other people. A few years ago there was a large outdoor festival that had a lot of people from vulnerable populations attending. The county director of emergency management asked if we could provide a bus to help cool people who were showing signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.”

One thing Alex has yet to provide buses for — but is prepared for — is an earthquake. “We have plans to provide assistance for major emergencies, such as an earthquake. The Portland Transportation Recovery Plan provides for TriMet to use buses to potentially move people but also supplies to distribution points within the city,” says Alex.

“I love that we’re able to do this,” continues Alex. “It’s just the right thing to do.”

As part of National Preparedness Month, Alex encourages everybody to visit ready.gov to learn how they can prepare for a disaster.

Header photo courtesy KPAM News Talk 860 & Afternoon Northwest

 

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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What You Want In The Next Generation Of MAX Trains

In a few years, we’ll be sending our high-floor MAX trains — which have been rolling since MAX first opened in 1986 —  off into the sunset. We’ll miss our Type 1’s (you never forget your first love…), but we’re excited about their replacements, the Type 6’s. Evidently, so are you.

Earlier this year, we asked what features you wanted to see in our next generation of MAX cars. Your requests were diverse and interesting, and we noticed some common themes. While we can’t yet make any promises about what our new trains will include, your suggestions are being used to guide our planning.

Here are your most common requests:

More and better interior displays

We’re on board with you here — clear interior displays that tell you where you are and where you’re going are essential. For our Type 6 trains, we’re asking for an upgrade from our current LED displays to dynamic route maps and next-stop displays. Our hope is for high-definition displays that can show graphics.

Comfortable seating and easy-to-navigate layouts

Your feedback on the open layout of the Type 5 trains — which were introduced in 2015 with the Orange Line — has been very positive, so the Type 6 trains will likely be similar. Regardless, we’re going to explore seat cushioning and layout options, so we can give you the most comfortable ride possible.

A safe ride

This is as non-negotiable for us as it is for you. For our Type 6 trains, we’re looking to add a silent alarm you can use to notify operators of security issues, higher definition on-board cameras for the recording as well as live streaming of security footage, and higher quality rear monitors so operators to have a clear image of what’s happening around the train during boarding.

There were several other common requests that we’ll be looking into, including WiFi, charging stations and USB ports, more leg room, easier boarding and exiting with wider doors and faster ramps, and more and better bike storage. Again, we make no promises but we’re looking at which requests we can accommodate.

So when you can expect these new train cars? Soon, but not too soon. You cannot go to the train store and pick out new cars to drive home (we wish…). These cars will be custom designed and built. We’re going to be looking for a manufacturer for these cars starting this year. Then the actual car design will kick off next year and manufacturing will start in 2020. If everything goes well, we hope to have the first new cars rolling in Portland by late 2021 or 2022. Stay tuned.

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Now Available: Reduced Fares for Low-Income Riders

If you have trouble affording your TriMet fare, relief may be available.

Oregon residents who are 18 to 64 years old and have an income less than twice the federal poverty level can apply to ride for a lower fare. If approved, you will save 50% off a single ride or day pass, or 72% off a month pass.

Application is a three-step process. You’ll need to…

  1. Show that your income qualifies
  2. Apply in-person at one of our community partner locations
  3. Pick up your personalized Hop card from the TriMet Ticket Office at Pioneer Square

We’ll walk you through each step. Find out if you’re eligible and apply today.

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Avoid Interstate Construction Traffic This Summer

Hearing the phrase “a good time to plan a vacation” about upcoming roadwork does not exactly inspire confidence in a smooth commute. But that is what’s being said about this summer’s I-84 and I-5 construction.

The projects, which run from July 8th through August 27th (with a brief early August break), will close three of the ramps that connect I-5 to I-84. Major traffic delays are expected for the length of the projects.

For many, MAX is going to be the best option for your commute. It may be crowded, but you won’t get bogged down in traffic. MAX Yellow Line is an alternative for I-5 in North Portland and the Blue, Green and Red lines can help you avoid I-84 (and parts of I-205).

Want to find the fastest way to work on TriMet? Plan your trip.

If don’t live near a MAX station, we have dozens of Park & Ride locations that provide free and easy parking near MAX stations.

Yellow Line riders have access to over 600 free parking spaces between the Expo Center and Delta Park/Vanport Park & Rides. Additionally, the Expo Center is allowing use of any other open spaces in its lot between July 8-20, July 25-August 6 and August 17-27, but a fee will apply for those.  

Red Line riders looking to avoid I-205 and I-84 have access to nearly 200 spaces at the Parkrose/Sumner Transit Center Park & Ride.

Blue Line riders have access to over 2,000 spaces at five Park & Rides between Cleveland Ave and Gateway Transit Center.

Similarly, Green Line riders have access to over 2,300 spaces at five Park & Rides between Clackamas Town Center and Gateway

Red, Blue and Green Line riders can also use the Gateway Transit Center Park & Ride’s nearly 700 spaces.

Many Park & Rides fill by 7-7:30 a.m. on a normal weekday, so we recommend arriving early.

See our full list of Park & Ride locations.

Buses will also provide a way through traffic during the roadwork. While they still may experience some delays, we’ve taken action to help keep them moving.

We’re anticipating significant delays approaching the Burnside Bridge during the ramp closure beginning July 25, so we’ve worked with the City of Portland to turn NE Davis between SE Sandy and SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd into bus and local access only on July 26-27, July 30-31, August 1-3, and August 20-24 from 6-11 a.m.. This should help keep Line 12, 19 and 20 buses moving.

Also during the ramp closures that start on July 25th, we’ve worked to restrict parking for additional hours on SE Morrison between SE 12th and SE 6th Ave and SE Madison between SE 10th and SE 6th. This will allow our buses to use the BUS ONLY lanes for longer as they approach the Morrison and Hawthorne bridges.

We will also have additional buses waiting at transit centers that can be pulled into service in case buses start to fill and go into “Drop Off Only” during the ramp closures.

Throughout the summer, C-TRAN’s express service between Vancouver and Downtown Portland is a viable alternative to MAX Yellow Line. C-TRAN is anticipating delays due to the expect congestion. Visit c-tran.com for more.

No matter how you plan on commuting this summer, transit will likely be a better option than driving for many who will be impacted by the I-5 / I-84 construction work. Here are helpful links for your commute:

Want to find the fastest way to work on TriMet? Plan your trip.

Worried about potential delays? Check out service alerts for your line.

New to TriMet? Here’s all you need to know to pay your fare and ride.

 

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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Starting July 1: A Fairer Citation Process

A court record can affect your ability to get a job, rent a house or serve in the military. But until now, a TriMet fare evasion citation had to be resolved within the court system, in most cases leading to a court record. We didn’t think that was right – skipping fare is not a crime that should have life-long consequences – and we’ve done something about it.

Starting July 1, a new law gives us a 90-day window to resolve some citations directly with riders. If you are an adult and receive a citation only for fare evasion, you will now have the option to resolve the citation outside of the court system by paying a fine, performing community service or enrolling in a reduced fare program. If the citation was given in error, you can provide us with evidence and we’ll dismiss the citation.

Eligible citations will come in an envelope with instructions for settling your citation online or by phone.

If you don’t resolve your citation with TriMet within the 90-day window, your only option will be to resolve it in court, where the presumptive fine will be $175 and the maximum fine $250.

Here are your new options for resolving an eligible citation with TriMet:

Appeal your citation

If you can demonstrate you had the correct fare, you can request a written appeal online within 45 days of receiving your citation. If the citation is not dismissed, you’ll still have the option to resolve it with TriMet by paying a reduced fine, performing community service, or enrolling in a reduced fare program.

Pay a fine

You can pay your fine — and possibly a reduced fine — online, via check, or over the phone within 90 days from when your citation was issued:

1st offense: $75
2nd offense: $100
3rd offense: $150
4th offense and beyond: $175

Perform community service

Instead of paying a fine, you can perform community service at the Oregon Food Bank, Rebuilding Center, Free Geek or Oregon Humane Society within 90 days from when your citation was issued:

1st offense: 4 hours
2nd offense: 7 hours
3rd offense: 12 hours
4th offense and beyond: 15 hours

Enroll in a reduced fare program

If you qualify — either though income, age or disability — for our Honored Citizen fare and successfully sign up and load $10 on your personalized Honored Citizen Hop card within 90 days, your fine will be waived upon verification by TriMet.

Specific instructions will be provided with your citation. Not all citations are eligible for this program. 

Please note that penalties or this process could change over time and this page may not contain the most up-to-date information. Please read the instructions that come with your citation for the current penalties and process.   

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to share our story, and to keep you up-to-date on how TriMet can help you navigate Portland. When I'm not working, I love to read, spend time outdoors, and visit tiki bars.

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