Category Archives: Benefits of Transit

Since her office moved, Sarah has a new perspective on her work commute

Sarah McCloskey
Sarah McCloskey

Until six months ago, my work commute between Beaverton and my office in Lake Oswego had consisted of driving a stretch of Hwy 217 during peak rush hour traffic each day. I tolerated the slow, bumper-to-bumper traffic in exchange for the convenience of driving my own car.

Since I started riding public transit, I’m more relaxed.

When I first learned that my firm would be relocating to Downtown Portland, I knew that I would need to make some major changes to my commute. If I were to continue driving to work, it would mean spending twice the time in rush hour traffic on two notoriously congested highways each day. I estimated that my monthly costs for driving and parking would amount to more than double the cost of a 1-Month Pass. Since I did not need the extra stress or expense of driving, the decision was simple: I would take public transit.

My new commute begins with a short ride on WES—now in its 5th year of service—to the Beaverton Transit Center. I enjoy comfortable seats, wide aisles, free Wifi and the friendly WES conductors. I also enjoy getting to know other regular riders that I see each day. After transferring to MAX, I have 25 minutes to get a jump on my morning email or catch up on news, books and crossword puzzles.

Since I started riding public transit, I’m more relaxed. I save money and I’m happy that I am doing my part to reduce carbon emissions and traffic congestion. When I began riding, I assumed I’d miss the convenience of driving, but, with frequent arrival times, a MAX stop right outside my office and no traffic jams, I’ve found it to be much more convenient than driving!

Sarah McCloskey is a marketing coordinator at Otak, Inc. She is a new TriMet rider and commutes from her home in Beaverton to her office in Downtown Portland.

Marisa Scheidegger

I'm TriMet's marketing communications coordinator. I write content for TriMet's web and social media, and customer-facing print materials. When I'm not working, I'm spending time with my husband and two incredibly bright and funny kids.

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For Katrina, her phone is her fare, and she couldn’t be happier

Why I Ride - Katrina
Whenever I tell people that I don’t have a driver’s license they’re always shocked. And when I tell them that prior to moving to Portland from Arizona, I didn’t have a car, they ask in horror, “How did you get around?” My answer: I took the bus, of course! I tell them my infamous work commute consisted of four miles of cycling, plus an hour-long bus ride.

Living in Portland is a transit-taker’s dream, and it’s a huge part of why I moved here…

Thankfully, I now live in a dense urban environment where I have a myriad of transit options. As someone who doesn’t drive, it’s not just a luxury to have access to frequent bus or train service, it’s a necessity. Living in Portland is a transit-taker’s dream, and it’s a huge part of why I moved here for graduate school three years ago.

Needless to say, when the TriMet Mobile Ticketing app was released, I literally jumped from my seat to start the download. I admit that I was a late adopter from my “dumb phone” to an iPhone, but I quickly made the transition into total digital reliance.

Since that day, the ticketing app has been the perfect addition to my transit repertoire, alongside PDX Bus and Transitive. I said goodbye to having to keep track of paper stubs and of how many tickets I had left before having to buy the next pack. Not at a grocery store or near a transit stop? Not a problem!

For me, the best thing about the app is that it’s basically foolproof. Buying tickets is easy because it remembers my card information, so even if I realize at the last moment that my pass is up, I can buy another in minutes. Whenever I see the bus on the horizon, I simply load up my app and prepare to board.

With over 60,000 downloads, the app has proven to be intuitive and easy to understand. And, when using the app for the first time, a simple explanation guides you from the get-go.

My phone literally is my fare, and I couldn’t be a happier transit rider.

Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman is a recent master of Urban Studies graduate from Portland State University and prides herself on being a pedestrian in Portland. She is currently the project Intern at DHM Research and has a blog called Think Urban. 

Marisa Scheidegger

I'm TriMet's marketing communications coordinator. I write content for TriMet's web and social media, and customer-facing print materials. When I'm not working, I'm spending time with my husband and two incredibly bright and funny kids.

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Access to transit is important to two local eateries in Southeast Portland

Becky Doggett
Becky Doggett

Becky Doggett and her husband, Scott Krombein, own two successful restaurants in Southeast Portland, Ford Food and Drink and Detour Café, both of which are served by Frequent Service Bus Line 4-Division/Fessenden.

“We specifically chose these locations because of their access to transit,” says Doggett. “These are neighborhoods have limited street parking, so good transit is essential. Half of our employees also take transit to work, the other half either bikes or walks. Only a few drive.”

Ford Food and Drink

Ford Food and Drink is situated at the corner of SE 11th & Division and is part of the historic Ford Building, which was built in 1915. A spacious coffee house with comfortable seating and huge tables, Ford Food and Drink is known for its homemade desserts and pastries.“Scott was the head baker at Pazzo Restaurant, Bar and Bakery downtown and now makes all our pastries and breads,” Becky says. “They are worth the visit.”

Ford Food and Drink also recently added a full bar to its offerings, has beer on tap and as a result now is bustling from early mornings through evening. Doggett is building an evening crowd with events and entertainment, including live music every Friday.

“We specifically chose these locations because of their access to transit,” says Doggett.

Ford employee Hannah Mizer moved here in December 2012 from San Diego and became car free. She has worked at Ford for the last seven months and takes great pride in her employer. “Ford Food and Drink has the best vegan brownies and the baristas are well trained in Stumptown and know how to make the perfect coffee—tasty and strong,” says Hannah.

Ford can be reached by Line 4 and Line 70-12th/NE 33rd Ave and is within walking distance of the future Clinton/SE 12th Ave MAX Station, which will open with the MAX Orange Line in September 2015.

Detour Café

Detour Cafe
Detour Cafe

Detour Café is a cozy breakfast and lunch place that caters to the neighborhood with choices like the Division Street Farmer’s Breakfast with organic potatoes, blanched kale with toasted seeds, homemade bread, choice of meat/faux meat, and an egg. It also has housemade granola, a variety of sandwich options made on their own focaccia bread, frittatas and bagels. The menu is befitting of Portland, which loves a great brunch. Detour also offers self-service Stumptown coffee and its own chai. Needless to say, lines of waiting customers are common on weekends.

Ford Food and Drink and Detour Café are easy destinations for Southeast Portland transit riders. Learn more about fordfoodanddrink.com and detourcafe.com.

TriMet does not endorse and is not responsible for any business, product or services mentioned in this blog article.

Marisa Scheidegger

I'm TriMet's marketing communications coordinator. I write content for TriMet's web and social media, and customer-facing print materials. When I'm not working, I'm spending time with my husband and two incredibly bright and funny kids.

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