Category Archives: Fun Stuff

BIKETOWN is coming

We know from our work creating the TriMet Bike Plan that our riders care about and rely on bike access. When BIKETOWN, Portland’s public bike share system, makes its debut tomorrow, many riders will have a new option for connecting to transit. That it’s healthy, fun and convenient is icing on the cake.

How does BIKETOWN work?

Ride for a single trip ($2.50), an entire day ($12) or for a whole year with an annual membership ($12/month).

Unlock a ride at the station using the computer and keypad on the back of the bike, and you’re on your way.

When you’re done, lock up at the station — the smart bike will know that you’ve finished your ride.

We like bike share because it extends the reach of transit, making trips by bus or train more accessible to more people. It also helps to make one-way bike trips possible and reduces barriers to biking like ownership, storage, maintenance and concerns about theft.

BIKETOWN

I’m looking forward to hearing and seeing how riders combine trips between BIKETOWN and TriMet. Personally, I’m excited to use bike share for short trips, connections to daytime meetings, getting out of the office for lunch and running errands after work.

BIKETOWN

A few things about BIKETOWN I’d like to point out:

  • If you ride on the Transit Mall (5th and 6th avenues) in Downtown Portland, be sure to stay on the left side of the roadway in the shared lanes and bike lane on portions of SW 5th. Please stay out of the transit lane(s) on the right side of the roadway, as these spaces are only for buses and trains.
  • Don’t bring the bikes on board. One of the best things about bike share is that you only use it when you need it — just park or pick up a bike wherever you’re connecting to the bus or train. (Plus, it doesn’t make sense to pay for bike share time on top of your transit fare.)
  • When you end your ride, if the BIKETOWN station closest to your destination is full, you can lock your bike at a public bike rack close to the station marked with an orange sticker for no additional charge. If you lock your bike at a public bike rack further from a station, a $2 fee applies.
  • The bikes don’t come with helmets, so bring your own if you want one and you plan on riding that day. Keeping a helmet at the office might be a good idea if you plan on riding during the day.
  • Cross tracks straight on. Crossing tracks at an angle or turning across tracks is risky — your wheel can slip into the trackbed and result in a crash. When in doubt, walk your bike across the tracks and check out these safety tips for riding a bike around transit vehicles.
  • You can make money using BIKETOWN. A little bit, anyway: Members who spot bike share bikes locked at public racks will be rewarded with a $1 account credit for returning them to a station.
  • Sneaker Bikes!

BIKETOWN

There are 100 BIKETOWN stations, which means lots of overlap with transit in Portland — take a look at the service area and station map to see what your next trip might look like.

As BIKETOWN establishes itself, we’ll continue working with our partners to encourage smooth connections for transit and bike riders. We hope to see you on a bright orange bike soon!

Learn more about BIKETOWN

Jeff Owen

Jeff Owen

I’m TriMet’s active transportation planner. I work with our regional partners to improve conditions for combining transit trips with walking and biking, including sidewalks, crossings, trails, bikeways, and bike parking. Away from work, I can be found walking, riding my bike, hiking or cheering in the Timbers Army.

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Instagram Roundup: June

The wait is finally over.

Summer is here, stretching out before us. The long, warm days have arrived — when we’re more likely to get out and visit friends, or take a picnic to the park, and linger happily into the evening hours.

We were tagged in more photos than ever this month, and it was inspiring to see our feed come to life. Here are some shots that sum up the month on Instagram:

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

Can I talk about fathers right now? I grew up with out one. I know many of you did as well! That gap in our life makes it difficult to receive and to give love. We’re forced to live independent from the love of a father. “For some of us, rules are the easy part, but letting someone love us…well that’s the hard part. Pride, in whatever form it takes, is a relational drug habit of individualism that we gotta drop if we want to move forward”. – Nate Kupish Their is a God though. A God That is a father to us all one who’s love has no limits and one who’s love for us has the ability to fill the empty spaces in our lives. He is not an absent God, but a present and living God. You may not believe in a God or Gods or spirituality. Just know that their is someone that adores and loves you. #portlandnw #pnwonderland

A photo posted by Todd Acosta (@todd.acosta) on

|| Max Ride Series No. 4: Quiet Passenger || After a bike accident I was having troubles riding my bicycle. In a sense commuting by Max train (Portland’s Metropolitan Area Express) has been a relaxing option. I get to see people and surroundings in different angles. Phone is still very handy to take candid photos as we all know it. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . shotoniphone #bw_instantscatcher #blackandwhiteisworththefight #portlandphotographer #jj_mobilephotography #myweekofcontrast #myfeatureshoot #gobytransit #youmobile#ig_shotz_bw #portlandnw #hikaricreative #bnw_life #bnw_rose #portlandoregon #bnw_planet #bnwmood #excellent_bnw #bnw_demand #blackandwhitephotography #flair_bw #ig_bw #streetlife_award #doubleyedge #icapture_mobile #photo_storee_bw #youmobile #streetphotography #outofphone #helloicp #gotd_1197

A photo posted by Migyoung Won (@migyoungwon) on

#trimetart #thingsifindwhilewalking #orangelining #ridetrimet

A photo posted by sweetmamamarie (@sweetmamamarie) on

Last stop

A photo posted by Gavin (@gavinrear) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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New bus shelter art bridges generations of Portlanders

Some Time Between Us, a project by artist Emily Fitzgerald, pairs 22 students from NE Portland’s Beaumont Middle School with older adults from the nearby Hollywood Senior Center. The group spent six weeks investigating their individual and cultural expressions of identity, independence and interdependence through storytelling, writing and photography.

During the intergenerational exchange, the senior and youth participants generated questions for each other and shared many individual personal reflections. The result of those conversations is documented in a series of five panels that are temporarily installed at the following bus shelters:

  • NE 33rd & Killingsworth
  • NE 27th & Killingsworth
  • NE Freemont and 42nd
  • NE Sandy and 42nd
  • SE Cesar Chavez Blvd & Stark

Take some time this summer to view the panels, which come down Sept. 9. Read more about the project at Photography as a Social Practice.

The project was supported by a grant from the Regional Arts and Culture Council.

Michelle Traver

Michelle Traver

As TriMet’s Public Art Administrator, I commission original artwork for our transit system to create connections to the communities we serve and celebrate our shared humanity. I’ve been a TriMetian for over 10 years!

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Meet Justina Carrillo, Our Part-Time Bus Operator of the Year

As a TriMet bus operator for the past 13 years, Justina Carrillo has had her share of good days and challenging ones.

One day was downright bizarre.

“I had one passenger tell me how to rob a bank,” she says. “He said ‘Just remember, these are the keys so you won’t do hard time.’ I laughed so hard.”

Another day that stands out for Carrillo happened just last month — her co-workers voted her as the 2016 Part-Time Bus Operator of the Year.

“It still doesn’t feel real,” says Carrillo, who typically drives Line 33-McLoughlin/King Rd and Line 85-Swan Island. “It surprised me. People are still coming up and saying they saw me on the website. It’s very nice to be recognized.”

Carrillo, no doubt, deserved the award. She’s already collected 21 National Safe Driving Awards — meaning no preventable accidents in 21 years of driving — and six Superior Performance Awards, earned by working at least 1,960 hours with no preventable accidents, warnings, reprimands or suspensions.

The secret to her success?

“It’s about safety first and trying not to take everything personally,” she says.

Getting started

Growing up in SE Portland, Carrillo’s parents always used TriMet. She even recalls riding buses on TriMet’s predecessor, the defunct Rose City Transit Company, as a young child.

“It’s funny that I drive professionally because my parents never drove,” she says.

After her parents passed away, Carrillo needed “something to do.” She started as an operator and trainer for LIFT, our paratransit service.

She spent 11 years at LIFT and was looking for a change. Another colleague persuaded her to apply to become a bus operator. It wasn’t the smoothest transition.

“At first, I didn’t like it,” Carrillo says. “My co-worker said to give it six months. She was right, because after six months, I really started to like it. It was like a second hat.”

Twenty-four years later, she’s still with us.

Justina Carrillo (3 of 3)

Pastimes

Carrillo has a life outside TriMet, which usually involves catching salmon or trout in the Columbia River.

“I’m not into catch and release,” she says. “I want to keep it if I spend all that time out there.”

She also tends to her vegetable garden where she grows tomatoes, zucchini and cucumbers.

One of her favorite pastimes is bingo, although it’s lost its popularity over the years. Carrillo says there used to be a dozen or so bingo halls all over town. Now there’s just a few left, including her favorite, DAV Bingo, in NE Portland.

No stopping her

Five years down the road, Carrillo envisions being in the same career. She may go full-time, but really appreciates the flexibility of her part-time schedule, which is 30 hours per week.

Her shifts go by fast because she enjoys what she does (despite the occasional advice on how to rob a bank).

“I like the people on my route,” she says. “I also love seeing the city and seeing the changes going on in the Portland area.”

We’re hiring bus operators! It’s $15/hour to start, and $28/hour after three years, with great benefits (including a 401K plan)! On average, part-time operators have the opportunity to go full-time after six months.
Interested? Apply today!
Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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Five Fun Things To Do in July!

Nothing beats an Oregon summer. After so many months of rain, we welcome the sun with open arms and celebrate the warmest season of the year with brews, blues, and inner tubes!

Here are a few fun events taking place this July and, of course, you can #GoByTransit!

Waterfront Blues Fest: July 1-4

LoveBomb Go-Go | Photo by Brit Forbes
LoveBomb Go-Go | Photo by Brit Forbes

Listen to some great tunes and help fight hunger at the same time! For its 29th year, the Blues Fest will take over the South Waterfront from July 1 through 4.

waterfrontbluesfest.com

The Big Float: July 10

Grab your inner tubes and get ready for the Big Float! Celebrate the Willamette River at this annual event — and everyone’s welcome! (This year the float features two 100-foot Slip & Slides!)

thebigfloat.com

Portland Highland Games: July 16

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The Highland Games bring the sights and sounds of the Scottish highlands to Rose City. Bagpipe bands, whiskey samples, highland dancers — there’s something for everyone at this event!

phga.org

PDX Pop Now! July 22-24

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This free, all-ages, non-profit festival returns this year with performances from 43 Portland artists. Catch the music, a street fair, food carts and more under the Hawthorne Bridge at AudioCinema.

pdxpopnow.com

Oregon Brewers Festival: July 27-31

Now, it wouldn’t be an Oregon summer without the annual Oregon Brewers Fest! For the 29th year in a row, you can sip more than 80 independent craft beers along the banks of the Willamette River. (Must be 21+ to attend this event.)

oregonbrewfest.com

Get out and enjoy fun in the sun — we’ll do the driving!

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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How We Roll Pop-Up Event [SLIDESHOW]

We took over Pioneer Courthouse Square yesterday afternoon to hand out fun stuff, play games, take pictures and say thanks to our awesome riders.

We loved seeing all the smiling faces — some of them might end up on our next wrapped bus or train!

View this slideshow on Flickr

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Settling down: Jeffery Evans’ winding journey to MAX Operator of the Year

OOY 2016 - jeffrey

Jeffery Evans was in a rut. He was working as a revenue officer for the IRS in Colorado, collecting delinquent tax returns.

“It’s a lot worse than it sounds,” he says.

He kept at it because of the good wages. The stress, though, took its toll.

One day, his wife suggested he quit. So he did. Together they traveled the world — Venezuela, Australia, New Zealand and all over North America.

Eventually, their travel funds ran dry and reality set in — they had to return to work. But they were not keen on Colorado, or where they had met and lived previously, the Bay Area.

“We rented a truck and drove up I-5,” Evans recalls. “We had no idea where we were going to go, but knew we wanted to check out Portland and Seattle.”

They never made it to Seattle. The couple stumbled upon a condo in Lake Oswego’s Mountain Park community and quickly began their second careers, his wife with the State of Oregon and Evans, with TriMet as a bus operator.

Train buff

He spent seven years operating a bus, but he always had his eye on MAX Light Rail. His love for trains goes back to his early childhood days in Kankakee, Illinois.

In the mid-1950s, his family had a small house near the main railroad line. Every afternoon, Evans’ mom would take him out into the yard to see “Harry the Choo Choo” engineer pull up and blow his whistle. Evans, about three years old at the time, would smile and wave. His dad began calling him “Box Car,” a nickname his brother revived when TriMet hired him as a MAX operator in 1998.

He’s paid it forward. He gets joy from seeing a child on a platform or sidewalk with their parents, giving an extra toot on the horn, or ring of the bell. “It always lifts me up,” he says. “It makes a good day that much better.”

His longevity and dedication to his profession has paid dividends as well. Just last month, TriMet bestowed upon him one of its highest honors — MAX Operator of the Year.

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MAX and bus operators qualify for this award based on outstanding driving records, customer service and attendance. Fellow operators vote for the winners.

“It was a feeling of excitement and shock,” he says when he first learned of the award. “It was like I was standing away watching myself, almost like an out-of-body experience.”

So long … and thanks for the memories

Coincidentally, a week after he became MAX Operator of the Year, Evans retired. He and his wife are leaving Oregon and building a house in Sedona, Arizona. They’ll move in next month.

He won’t quickly forget TriMet, however, where he made many great memories and friends. He enjoyed the independence his job brought, which allowed him to trade shifts with co-workers so he could take longer vacations.

As a bus operator, he fondly remembers driving an extra service bus and picking up three high school prom-bound couples whose limo had broken down on SW 5th and Washington. Evans picked up the kids, who were noticeably excited (and relieved), and cruised down NW 23rd with the prom-goers waving out the window to bystanders on the sidewalk. Once they got to Montgomery Park, the official yearbook photographer took photos of all the couples exiting the bus.

Also, earlier this year, he briefly appeared in a Siemens commercial filmed in Portland and Gresham, a process he enjoyed being a part of.

Final stop, Arizona

Evans is excited to explore Arizona’s wilderness on foot and motorcycle. He plans to backpack through the Grand Canyon and Sycamore Canyon. He looks forward to cruising on his motorcycle down to Baja and central Mexico.

Jeff Evans

Will he miss Oregon? The short answer: Yes.

“We have many friends we’ve made over the years here,” he says. “As it turns out, the best time of year to visit Oregon is the best time of year to be out of Arizona. I envision about this time every year loading up one of our vehicles with camping gear, heading to Southern California and driving up coast. We’ll hang out in Oregon until I see the first rain cloud, and get back to Arizona.”

It appears Evans is ready to grow new roots in the desert.

“I think Sedona is going to be our final stop — this place is perfect for us.”

Interested in a career with TriMet? Apply today!
Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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