Category Archives: In the Community

Instagram Roundup: November

Our Instagram feed has been a welcome respite from a busy (to say the least) month. Indeed, the pictures you’ve shared with us have been pensive, serene, dazzling and even funny (thanks, Unipiper!).

Taken on my commute in from SE. #rx100 #trimet

A photo posted by Bryton Wilson (@brytonw) on

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Portland commuting #fujix70

A photo posted by Takeshi Okuno (@tkc09) on

Something so wrong about these numbers makes them so right.

A photo posted by Jason Garland Sturgill (@jgspdx) on

Just a causal afternoon ride on the Portland Trimet Max 🚊🚃🚋🚉 #Max #Portland #Trimet #casual#afternoon

A photo posted by Erin McCabe (@pumpkinberrie) on

⚡tonight⚡

A photo posted by Kody Youmans (@xo_kody) on

Portland 😍 getting little festive ✨

A photo posted by Nabina Nazar (@nabinanazar) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Instagram Roundup: October

Could October be the moodiest month?

Judging by the photos we were tagged in, that may well be the case. We’ve seen sudden downpours, fiery red leaves falling, spectacular sunsets and skies of every color. (Sure, we’re in for six months of darkness, but at least we’re going out in style!)

Motion

A photo posted by ANAND (@anandbc) on

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#autumn #fall #rain #leafs #leaf #glass #color #portland #trimet #bus

A photo posted by Alex Jones (@http.fantomboy.13) on

When you accidentally walk by the #OCI max while it’s riding by! 👍🏽 #ocikitchenninja #ocisugarbakers #happyfriday

A photo posted by Oregon Culinary Institute🔪 (@ocikitchenninja) on

SUPER BONUS: Portland’s favorite golden retriever rescue, Rusty Rodas, shared the #GoByTransit love.

On my way to work. #publictransportation #portland

A photo posted by RUSTY RODAS (@rustyrodas) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Tour the New FFTTNW Murals by Transit

If you’ve noticed a new mural along your commute, it’s likely to be from this year’s crop of FFTTNW projects (that’s short for Forest For The Trees Northwest, a non-profit dedicated to contemporary public art). These include seven stunning large-format murals and one imaginative airport installment.

Each is worth visiting, and all are easily accessible by transit — in fact, you could probably tour them in the space of an afternoon. (We’d recommend taking a little more time, though, to visit the businesses on the other side of the murals, which include a cider house, maker spaces, a gallery and restaurant.)

Here’s a sample itinerary:

1. Disjecta — Molly Bounds,  Alex Gardner and Maxwell McMaster

8371 N Interstate Ave.

A photo posted by Forest For The Trees (@ffttnw) on


Start with the soft pastel hues outside this vibrant contemporary arts center in Kenton, right off the Yellow Line (near Paul Bunyan).

2. The Make House — Adam Friedman

8371 N Interstate Ave.

A photo posted by Forest For The Trees (@ffttnw) on

One stop south on the Yellow Line brings you a short walk from Adam Friedman’s trippy vision of Mt. Hood, painted on the side of the Make House on Interstate.

3. Cider Riot — Peach Momoko and Camille Rose Garcia

807 NE Couch St.


Continuing to the Rose Quarter and connecting to Line 6 or Portland Streetcar at the convention center, make your way to the cluster of murals on the inner eastside.

4. ADX — Nina Chanel Abney and Yoshi47

417 SE 11th Ave.

A photo posted by Forest For The Trees (@ffttnw) on


You’re already smiling at this one.

5. The Redd — Zach Yarrington and David Rice

1140 SE 7th Ave.

A photo posted by Zach Yarrington (@zachumz) on


What does it say? You’ll have to go there to find out.

6. Hanoi Kitchen — Jesse Hazelip

7925 NE Glisan St.

A photo posted by Forest For The Trees (@ffttnw) on


Catch a Line 19 bus out to this Montavilla restaurant to see this inspired piece by artist and tattooist Jesse Hazelip. Can you tell where his inspiration comes from?

7. PDX Terminal A — J. Shea

7000 NE Airport Way

A photo posted by Forest For The Trees (@ffttnw) on


Finally, catch a Red Line train from Gateway TC to the final installation, located inside Portland International Airport (before security). Here, mixed media artist J. Shea has more than a mural: (literally) wiry figures are suspended mid-air, appropriately suggesting flight and movement.

Of course, there’s no wrong way to visit these public art pieces — try using the map below to plan your own journey:

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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5 Reasons to Go Car-Free

Every year on (or around) September 22, the planet comes together to celebrate World Carfree Day. This global car-free movement encourages motorists to leave their cars behind and try alternative modes of transportation for one day.

Thinking about going car-free? Here are some reasons to give it a try:

#1. It saves you money.

When you take TriMet, you don’t have to pay for parking or gas. But if you go completely car-free, you don’t have to worry about loans, car payments, insurance or maintenance costs.

Fact: According to the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), transit riders in Portland can save up to $861 a month ($10,334 a year).

#2. It’s less stress.

The average American driver can spend up to 450 hours each year on the road, resulting in rising levels of frustration and stress that can really take a toll on your quality of life. By taking public transportation, you can use your commute time to read, text friends, or just take some well-deserved “me” time.

tm63

#3. It’s safer.

According to a study released by APTA, commuters reduce their risk of of being in a traffic accident by more than 90 percent by simply taking public transit over commuting by car.

Fact: Cities that average more than 50 annual transit trips per capita have about half the average traffic fatality rates as cities where residents average fewer than 20 annual trips.

#4. It’s better for the environment.

Choosing to walk, bike, or take public transit during your commute helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions and traffic congestion. When you decide to reduce your carbon footprint, you help keep our planet clean!

#5. It’s good for your health.

We’re just more active when we’re less dependent on cars. Taking public transportation helps us get in more exercise because of the walking and biking we do getting to and from our stops.

Fact: A study in North Carolina showed that light rail passengers were 81% less likely to become obese over time and would lose an average of 7 pounds over a one-year period.

Bikes on Tilikum Crossing

Are you up for the car-free challenge?

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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Instagram Roundup: July

These are decidedly not the dog days of summer — our month on Instagram began with local hero Moshow the Cat Rapper proclaiming his love for public transit (see below). Then we started to see lots of Pokémon, and we even got a check-in from a cartoon slice of bacon.

And on July 19, everything turned orange as BIKETOWN, Portland’s new public bike share program, hit the streets with an opening event along the MAX Orange Line. (This also happened to be Portland Streetcar’s 15th birthday.)

Here’s what we saw this month:

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Portland bound #transitisbetterineurope #misseurope #pdx #selfie @glideslope

A photo posted by Jose Lariz (@pierreazis) on

🐥 🚌 🎱 “a heart so true” #pokemongo

A photo posted by segreen (@segreens) on

Olympus Mju ii // Rollei Chrome 200 cross processed

A photo posted by @now.developing on

TriMet Orange Line, end of line art. Morning commuters! #Commuter #Early #Art #Portland #TriMet #MAX

A photo posted by Big Milky (@oregonjacques) on

Livin’ today to the MAX!

A photo posted by PDX bacon (@pdxbacon) on

we are tired of driving… good thing portland comes with a chauffeur. #justopherontheroad

A photo posted by ⓒ ⓗ ⓡ ⓘ ⓢ ⓣ ⓞ ⓟ ⓗ ⓔ ⓡ (@therealcwalk) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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BIKETOWN launches at Tilikum Crossing

Last Tuesday, BIKETOWN — Portland’s new public bike share system — hit the streets. We were at the launch event at Tilikum Crossing:

Ready to try it? Check out our tips for getting the most out of BIKETOWN.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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BIKETOWN is coming

We know from our work creating the TriMet Bike Plan that our riders care about and rely on bike access. When BIKETOWN, Portland’s public bike share system, makes its debut tomorrow, many riders will have a new option for connecting to transit. That it’s healthy, fun and convenient is icing on the cake.

How does BIKETOWN work?

Ride for a single trip ($2.50), an entire day ($12) or for a whole year with an annual membership ($12/month).

Unlock a ride at the station using the computer and keypad on the back of the bike, and you’re on your way.

When you’re done, lock up at the station — the smart bike will know that you’ve finished your ride.

We like bike share because it extends the reach of transit, making trips by bus or train more accessible to more people. It also helps to make one-way bike trips possible and reduces barriers to biking like ownership, storage, maintenance and concerns about theft.

BIKETOWN

I’m looking forward to hearing and seeing how riders combine trips between BIKETOWN and TriMet. Personally, I’m excited to use bike share for short trips, connections to daytime meetings, getting out of the office for lunch and running errands after work.

BIKETOWN

A few things about BIKETOWN I’d like to point out:

  • If you ride on the Transit Mall (5th and 6th avenues) in Downtown Portland, be sure to stay on the left side of the roadway in the shared lanes and bike lane on portions of SW 5th. Please stay out of the transit lane(s) on the right side of the roadway, as these spaces are only for buses and trains.
  • Don’t bring the bikes on board. One of the best things about bike share is that you only use it when you need it — just park or pick up a bike wherever you’re connecting to the bus or train. (Plus, it doesn’t make sense to pay for bike share time on top of your transit fare.)
  • When you end your ride, if the BIKETOWN station closest to your destination is full, you can lock your bike at a public bike rack close to the station marked with an orange sticker for no additional charge. If you lock your bike at a public bike rack further from a station, a $2 fee applies.
  • The bikes don’t come with helmets, so bring your own if you want one and you plan on riding that day. Keeping a helmet at the office might be a good idea if you plan on riding during the day.
  • Cross tracks straight on. Crossing tracks at an angle or turning across tracks is risky — your wheel can slip into the trackbed and result in a crash. When in doubt, walk your bike across the tracks and check out these safety tips for riding a bike around transit vehicles.
  • You can make money using BIKETOWN. A little bit, anyway: Members who spot bike share bikes locked at public racks will be rewarded with a $1 account credit for returning them to a station.
  • Sneaker Bikes!

BIKETOWN

There are 100 BIKETOWN stations, which means lots of overlap with transit in Portland — take a look at the service area and station map to see what your next trip might look like.

As BIKETOWN establishes itself, we’ll continue working with our partners to encourage smooth connections for transit and bike riders. We hope to see you on a bright orange bike soon!

Learn more about BIKETOWN

Jeff Owen

Jeff Owen

I’m TriMet’s active transportation planner. I work with our regional partners to improve conditions for combining transit trips with walking and biking, including sidewalks, crossings, trails, bikeways, and bike parking. Away from work, I can be found walking, riding my bike, hiking or cheering in the Timbers Army.

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