Category Archives: In the Community

BIKETOWN is coming

We know from our work creating the TriMet Bike Plan that our riders care about and rely on bike access. When BIKETOWN, Portland’s public bike share system, makes its debut tomorrow, many riders will have a new option for connecting to transit. That it’s healthy, fun and convenient is icing on the cake.

How does BIKETOWN work?

Ride for a single trip ($2.50), an entire day ($12) or for a whole year with an annual membership ($12/month).

Unlock a ride at the station using the computer and keypad on the back of the bike, and you’re on your way.

When you’re done, lock up at the station — the smart bike will know that you’ve finished your ride.

We like bike share because it extends the reach of transit, making trips by bus or train more accessible to more people. It also helps to make one-way bike trips possible and reduces barriers to biking like ownership, storage, maintenance and concerns about theft.

BIKETOWN

I’m looking forward to hearing and seeing how riders combine trips between BIKETOWN and TriMet. Personally, I’m excited to use bike share for short trips, connections to daytime meetings, getting out of the office for lunch and running errands after work.

BIKETOWN

A few things about BIKETOWN I’d like to point out:

  • If you ride on the Transit Mall (5th and 6th avenues) in Downtown Portland, be sure to stay on the left side of the roadway in the shared lanes and bike lane on portions of SW 5th. Please stay out of the transit lane(s) on the right side of the roadway, as these spaces are only for buses and trains.
  • Don’t bring the bikes on board. One of the best things about bike share is that you only use it when you need it — just park or pick up a bike wherever you’re connecting to the bus or train. (Plus, it doesn’t make sense to pay for bike share time on top of your transit fare.)
  • When you end your ride, if the BIKETOWN station closest to your destination is full, you can lock your bike at a public bike rack close to the station marked with an orange sticker for no additional charge. If you lock your bike at a public bike rack further from a station, a $2 fee applies.
  • The bikes don’t come with helmets, so bring your own if you want one and you plan on riding that day. Keeping a helmet at the office might be a good idea if you plan on riding during the day.
  • Cross tracks straight on. Crossing tracks at an angle or turning across tracks is risky — your wheel can slip into the trackbed and result in a crash. When in doubt, walk your bike across the tracks and check out these safety tips for riding a bike around transit vehicles.
  • You can make money using BIKETOWN. A little bit, anyway: Members who spot bike share bikes locked at public racks will be rewarded with a $1 account credit for returning them to a station.
  • Sneaker Bikes!

BIKETOWN

There are 100 BIKETOWN stations, which means lots of overlap with transit in Portland — take a look at the service area and station map to see what your next trip might look like.

As BIKETOWN establishes itself, we’ll continue working with our partners to encourage smooth connections for transit and bike riders. We hope to see you on a bright orange bike soon!

Learn more about BIKETOWN

Jeff Owen

Jeff Owen

I’m TriMet’s active transportation planner. I work with our regional partners to improve conditions for combining transit trips with walking and biking, including sidewalks, crossings, trails, bikeways, and bike parking. Away from work, I can be found walking, riding my bike, hiking or cheering in the Timbers Army.

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Instagram Roundup: June

The wait is finally over.

Summer is here, stretching out before us. The long, warm days have arrived — when we’re more likely to get out and visit friends, or take a picnic to the park, and linger happily into the evening hours.

We were tagged in more photos than ever this month, and it was inspiring to see our feed come to life. Here are some shots that sum up the month on Instagram:

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

Can I talk about fathers right now? I grew up with out one. I know many of you did as well! That gap in our life makes it difficult to receive and to give love. We’re forced to live independent from the love of a father. “For some of us, rules are the easy part, but letting someone love us…well that’s the hard part. Pride, in whatever form it takes, is a relational drug habit of individualism that we gotta drop if we want to move forward”. – Nate Kupish Their is a God though. A God That is a father to us all one who’s love has no limits and one who’s love for us has the ability to fill the empty spaces in our lives. He is not an absent God, but a present and living God. You may not believe in a God or Gods or spirituality. Just know that their is someone that adores and loves you. #portlandnw #pnwonderland

A photo posted by Todd Acosta (@todd.acosta) on

|| Max Ride Series No. 4: Quiet Passenger || After a bike accident I was having troubles riding my bicycle. In a sense commuting by Max train (Portland’s Metropolitan Area Express) has been a relaxing option. I get to see people and surroundings in different angles. Phone is still very handy to take candid photos as we all know it. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . shotoniphone #bw_instantscatcher #blackandwhiteisworththefight #portlandphotographer #jj_mobilephotography #myweekofcontrast #myfeatureshoot #gobytransit #youmobile#ig_shotz_bw #portlandnw #hikaricreative #bnw_life #bnw_rose #portlandoregon #bnw_planet #bnwmood #excellent_bnw #bnw_demand #blackandwhitephotography #flair_bw #ig_bw #streetlife_award #doubleyedge #icapture_mobile #photo_storee_bw #youmobile #streetphotography #outofphone #helloicp #gotd_1197

A photo posted by Migyoung Won (@migyoungwon) on

#trimetart #thingsifindwhilewalking #orangelining #ridetrimet

A photo posted by sweetmamamarie (@sweetmamamarie) on

Last stop

A photo posted by Gavin (@gavinrear) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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New bus shelter art bridges generations of Portlanders

Some Time Between Us, a project by artist Emily Fitzgerald, pairs 22 students from NE Portland’s Beaumont Middle School with older adults from the nearby Hollywood Senior Center. The group spent six weeks investigating their individual and cultural expressions of identity, independence and interdependence through storytelling, writing and photography.

During the intergenerational exchange, the senior and youth participants generated questions for each other and shared many individual personal reflections. The result of those conversations is documented in a series of five panels that are temporarily installed at the following bus shelters:

  • NE 33rd & Killingsworth
  • NE 27th & Killingsworth
  • NE Freemont and 42nd
  • NE Sandy and 42nd
  • SE Cesar Chavez Blvd & Stark

Take some time this summer to view the panels, which come down Sept. 9. Read more about the project at Photography as a Social Practice.

The project was supported by a grant from the Regional Arts and Culture Council.

Michelle Traver

Michelle Traver

As TriMet’s Public Art Administrator, I commission original artwork for our transit system to create connections to the communities we serve and celebrate our shared humanity. I’ve been a TriMetian for over 10 years!

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How We Roll Pop-Up Event [SLIDESHOW]

We took over Pioneer Courthouse Square yesterday afternoon to hand out fun stuff, play games, take pictures and say thanks to our awesome riders.

We loved seeing all the smiling faces — some of them might end up on our next wrapped bus or train!

View this slideshow on Flickr

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Do your part & take care of your heart

When I’m not in the office, you’ll often find me outside taking a walk with my dog, Milo. We try to walk about three miles a day, and if we have the time and the weather’s nice, we’ll head out of town for a hike. (McNeil Point is one of my favorite hikes, and not because of its name!)

Here's Milo!
Me and Milo!

Over the years, it’s become more and more important for me to be active. At work, we’re often sitting at our computers, sitting in meetings, sitting during conference calls — so I do stress to everyone who works at TriMet to incorporate a little bit of activity in their day — even if it is just taking a quick walk during your lunch break.

That’s why I’m happy to announce that TriMet will be participating in the Heart & Stroke Walk on May 21 at the Portland International Raceway. Myself and over 125 TriMet employees are taking part in this year’s walk to help promote the prevention, treatment and care for cardiovascular disease — the leading killer in the United States. We have over 18 TriMet teams walking this year (with some great names, like “E=MC Awesome” and “Groove is in the Heart”).

Hope to see you out at the Heart Walk! Don’t forget that you can take transit (MAX Yellow Line) there!

Learn more about the 2016 Oregon & SW Washington Heart & Stroke Walk

Neil McFarlane, TriMet General Manager

As the General Manager of TriMet, I'm responsible for running the agency. I've been here at TriMet since 1991, when I started as project control director for the Westside light rail project. When I'm not at work, I enjoy spending time with my family and riding the bus and MAX. Maybe I'll see you during my commute.

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TriMetiquette: Let’s ride together!

The 1st Avenue MAX Improvements project has begun and for the next two weeks, May 8-21, it’s going to be a bit chaotic on our trains.

During this time, we’ll be sending out fewer trains, and all MAX lines will be running on adjusted schedules and reduced frequencies. Depending on your commute, you may have to transfer to a shuttle bus or walk a few extra blocks to your destination.

It’s going to be different — possibly a little hectic and crazy — but if we practice good TriMetiquette while we ride, it will help us navigate this disruption a little smoother.

  • With fewer trains running, space is going to be tight on board. Help out your fellow riders by moving towards the back of the bus and up the stairs on Type 4 and 5 MAX trains. (Take advantage of these cramped quarters and chat with your neighbor about the latest Game of Thrones episode.)
  • When boarding buses and trains, please let exiting riders off first. Even if you’re eager to get on board (especially if you’ve been waiting for a while), it’s easier for everyone if you let folks off the bus or train first.
  • Seats are for butts — not bags, newspapers, laptops, or feet. (Yuck!)
  • With so many riders on board it’s bound to be noisy. Please use headphones and keep your voice down during phone call conversations.
  • Offer up priority seats. In the priority seating areas, you are required to move for seniors and people with disabilities. (They need that seat more than you do!)

We sincerely appreciate your patience as we work to complete this  important project. Have an etiquette reminder you’d like to share with others? Tag your tweets with #TriMetiquette.

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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Four Ways to Celebrate Black History Month

In a smart Slate piece about more thoughtful ways to celebrate Black History Month, Aisha Harris implores readers to do more — to make an effort to learn something new about the black community or experience.

So if you haven’t already, now’s a great time to start. We’ve gathered some ideas below — these upcoming events will broaden your perspective and offer insight into the past, present and future of African-American culture. Each is guaranteed to be engaging and thought-provoking, and all are accessible by transit.

Cascade Festival of African Films

Thursday, Friday and Saturday screenings through March 5 at PCC Cascade Campus’ Moriarty Arts & Humanities Building. Free.

woman

The films being shown this year take on subjects as varied as urban life, gender equality and religious fundamentalism, but the majority of them share a common trait: They were made by African directors. This makes for a great opportunity to explore the continent’s diverse cultures through the lens of first-hand experience.

The festival’s centerpiece film, Run, plays February 19 at 7 p.m. at the Hollywood Theatre. Free.

The festival’s centerpiece film is Run, which takes place in the present-day Ivory Coast. The story reflects on the journey of a man named Run, who is in hiding after assassinating the country’s prime minister. It’s described as “impassioned and poetic…a strong allegory for the people and history of contemporary Ivory Coast.”

Portland Black Film Festival

Through February 27 at the Hollywood Theatre. General admission $8.

Bringing things closer to home, this young film festival focuses on the black experience in America. Seven films will be screened, including A Ballerina’s Tale, the story of prodigal ballerina Misty Copeland, and the only known print of Catch My Soul, a 1974 rock opera treatment of Othello (!).

African American Read-In

February 14 at 2 p.m. at the North Portland Library; Teen Read-In is February 26 at 4 p.m. at the St. Johns Library. Free.

Two Multnomah County Libraries have gathered community leaders, teachers, students and local celebrities to read from their favorite books by black authors — but you can do more than just listen. Everyone will be able to share words from their favorite works, and children and young adults will be able to enjoy special gatherings.

PDX Jazz Fest

February 18–26 at a dozen Portland venues. Tickets for individual shows from $15.

High-Res_Alicia_Olatuja_0937_1600x600b

This festival began 13 years ago as a Black History Month initiative to heighten jazz outreach and education in Portland, and now it’s bringing world-class performances to our city. Jazz is one of America’s most celebrated art forms, with roots in hundreds of years of the black experience — but it’s not all history. What you’ll discover at these shows and talks is that jazz is an ever-evolving medium.

So whether you’re at an intimate club like the iconic Jimmy Mak’s or seated in the Newmark Theater, taking in a tribute to the greats or watching a virtuoso harpist who has recorded with Drake, you’re sure to marvel at how vital jazz really is.


The final point Harris makes in her article is that we need to continue this conversation year-round — not just every February. So after you’ve enjoyed the festivals and events, consider that there is infinitely more to share and learn. There are people to meet, businesses to become acquainted with, books to read and lots of history to consider.

All this is especially important to us as a transit service (as everyone who knows Rosa Parks’ story can attest). We have an ongoing responsibility to steer our legacy toward fairness, understanding and appreciation — that’s what drives our transit equity and diversity work, and why we encourage everyone to celebrate Black History Month.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Date night ideas—all accessible by transit!

heart rosette whitebgValentine’s Day is just around the corner, so why not surprise your sweetheart with a date you can get to by bus or train? Here are some fun (and frugal!) date nights — and you don’t have to drive!

The good ol’ go-to

Who doesn’t love dinner and a movie? MAX Blue and Red lines will take you right to the Regal Lloyd Center Cinema, or hop on the Green Line to check out Clackamas Town Center’s XD Theater. Want to have dinner delivered to your seat during the film? Check out the Living Room Theater in Downtown Portland. The Portland Streetcar and Line 20-Burnside/Stark will take you there.

Brunch lovers

Forget the fancy dinner and take your Valentine out to brunch. Portland — known for its brunch scene — is chock full of great spots. Here are a few you can get to by public transportation: Old Salt Marketplace (Line 75-Cesar Chavez/Lombard), Kerns Kitchen (Line 19-Woodstock/Glisan), An Xuyen (Line 14-Hawthorne), and Roman Candle (Line 4-Division/Fessenden).

Plan a private pub crawl

Perfect for the beer lover in your life! Stay safe and off the streets by planning your crawl along a bus, train or Portland Streetcar route. Need a little inspiration? Here’s a Belmont pub crawl by bus, a pub crawl through the Pearl District and a crawl all along the streetcar’s North/South Line.

Play in the park

Washington Park, that is! Take MAX Blue or Red lines to the Washington Park MAX Station and explore! There’s not much in bloom at the International Rose Garden, and the Portland Japanese Garden is closed through March, but you can still enjoy a stroll with your sweetie through the Oregon Zoo, Hoyt Arboretum or the World Forestry Center.

Nature lovers

Spend some alone time with your Valentine in the wild outdoors. There are so many hiking trails accessible by transit, rain or shine! Frolic through Forest Park — Lines 15, 20 and MAX can get you there .

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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5 tips for a happy—and safe—holiday season

The holidays are a time of wonder and goodwill, and for the men and women of the Transit Police Division, a time to step up our patrols on the TriMet system. In an effort to keep the Grinch at bay, we need your help to make sure your belongings (and those holiday purchases) make it home with you.

P1030533
Lt. Rachel Andrew chats with a rider on how to travel safely this holiday season.

So far this month, we’ve noticed a good thing—riders being more courteous to each other. This is something we hope to see year round! But please don’t get complacent—thieves will strike when you least expect it.

Here are the top five tips to make sure you have a happy and safe holiday season:

  1. Pay attention to your belongings.

Too often we see someone hang up their bike on MAX and then go sit down with their back to it. A thief could make off with your bike and you wouldn’t notice! So far, two-thirds of reported thefts this year were items left behind or lost and never turned in to Lost & Found, so please keep track of your things.

  1. Pay attention to your surroundings.

We can all get so caught up in our phones or devices that might not notice someone watching us. Look up every so often to see who is around you and trust your instincts. When you hear, “Doors are closing, please hang on,” on MAX, make sure to hang on to your phone and other items. Thieves often look for opportunities to snatch-and-run as vehicles are about to leave a stop.

  1. Don’t leave valuables in your car at Park & Rides.

Leaving items, especially valuables, in plain view in your parked car is an invitation to thieves. If you must leave packages or other things in your car, make sure they are out of sight or locked in a trunk. If a thief walks by and doesn’t see anything worth breaking a window for, they’ll likely move on.

  1. See something. Say something.

If you see something suspicious, please say something. Tell your operator or call 9-1-1 immediately—we’ll decide what’s important. You never know, your call could prevent a crime.

  1. Look and listen when crossing tracks and streets.

Please listen for approaching trains and look both ways when crossing tracks. Take your time and don’t run across—a few seconds could save your life.

All year round, Transit Police officers patrol the system, hopping on trains and buses, and interacting with riders at stations and transit centers. During the holidays, we increase our missions to keep those looking to spoil the season from targeting you and your stuff.

P1030536
Happy holidays from the Transit Police Division!
Christina Hansen-Tuma

Christina Hansen-Tuma

I’m Officer Christina Hansen-Tuma with the Transit Police Division. Working in transit, I get to meet different people across the metro area and help make TriMet a system that my grandmother would enjoy riding. When I’m not on the job, I’m busy spending time with my kids and running in marathons!

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2015 Holiday Events Guide

Who doesn’t love November? Sure, the brisk weather and short days can catch us off guard. But once we get past that, our holiday spirit begins to surface as we come together for food, family and festivals.

Here are 10 upcoming celebrations to get you started:

Macy’s Holiday Parade

Friday, Nov. 27 at 9 a.m.
Downtown Portland

Shake off your post-stuffing stupor with a morning of grand floats, costumed characters (nearly 500 of them!) and local marching bands parading through Downtown.

Tree Lighting Ceremony

Friday, Nov. 27 at 5:30 p.m.
Pioneer Courthouse Square

There’s a 75-foot tree in the middle of Pioneer Courthouse Square — you may have seen it — waiting to be lit for the holidays. As part of the ceremony, Thomas Lauderdale will lead members of Pink Martini, the Pacific Youth Choir, The von Trapps, and thousands of onlookers in a holiday sing-a-long. Come prepared: Download a copy of the songbook here.

ZooLights

ZooLights

Friday, Nov. 27 through Sunday, Jan. 3
5–9 p.m.
5–8 p.m. on Value Nights
Oregon Zoo

There are 1.5 million lights on display at the Oregon Zoo’s annual winter festival, but that’s only one reason it’s so popular. This year, think “train” when you go to ZooLights — there’s a special Zoo Railway loop you won’t want to miss, plus big savings for anyone who takes MAX to the event.

Tip: The Sunset Transit Center Park & Ride often fills up on Blazers game nights — consider using a different lot if you’re planning to visit those evenings.

Holiday Ale Festival

Wednesday, Dec. 2–Sunday, Dec. 6
11 a.m.–10 p.m. most nights
Pioneer Courthouse Square

What would an events guide be without a beer festival? Keep warm by sampling more than 50 exclusive and rare brews, from Belgians to barleywines to porters and stouts. Keep your phone handy when you’re there, because the mobile version of the festival’s site will have up-to-the-second updates on beer tappings and locations.

Christmas Ships

Christmas Ships

Friday, Dec. 4–Sunday, Dec. 20
Parade on the Willamette and Columbia rivers, starting most nights at RiverPlace Marina

The first Christmas Ship sailed solo from the Portland Yacht Club back in 1954; now, nearly 60 boats light up the Willamette and Columbia rivers in what’s become a grand Portland tradition. If you’re taking in the spectacle this year, be sure to track the fleet on Twitter. And if you’re looking for a new vantage point, may we suggest Tilikum Crossing?

First Night at Director Park

Sunday, Dec. 6 at 4 p.m.
Director Park

This year’s celebration of the first night of Chanukah features a special ice menorah (ice menorah!), music, latkes and activities for kids. It’s a community collaboration between Chabad of Oregon, the American Red Cross and Portland Fire & Rescue — pitch in by bringing travel-size toiletries to be given to VA Hospitals and Stand Downs, events providing supplies and services to homeless veterans.

Super Colossal Holiday Sale

Saturday, Dec. 12–Sunday, Dec. 13
11 a.m.–6 p.m.
Oregon Convention Center

Need to get gifts for your sister, grandfather, boss, best friend, neighbor, et cetera?

Try Crafty Wonderland’s Super Colossal Holiday Sale — you won’t be disappointed. With 60,000 square feet of handmade gifts, goodies, art and crafts from Northwest artisans (and beyond!), this is your one-stop holiday shop.

Portland Posada & Holiday Bazaar

Posada: Saturday, Dec. 12 at 10 a.m.
Holiday Bazaar: Saturday Dec. 12–Sunday, Dec. 20
Portland Mercado

Looking for something a little smaller than the Super Colossal sale, and with great food? Head to the Portland Mercado for the inaugural Portland Posada, an all-day craft fair with specialty food and drinks, a gift drive and musical performances.

What makes Posada even more special is that it’s tied to Latin American holiday traditions, and that it celebrates philanthropy and creative entrepreneurship. Plus, it marks the kickoff of the Holiday Bazaar, a nine-day pop-up gift shop in the heart of the Mercado.

Winter Village

Friday, Dec. 18–Sunday, Jan. 3
10 a.m.–10 p.m.
Orenco Station Plaza

Be the first to take the ice at the Winter Village, an open-air ice skating experience making its debut at the Orenco Station Plaza. Hop on MAX and you’ll be at the rink in no time — this one’s right across from the Orenco/NW 231st Ave Station!

Portland Winter Light Festival

Portland Winter Light Festival

Wednesday, Feb. 3–Sunday, Feb. 7
5–11 p.m.
OMSI

In the bleak midwinter, a light! Or, actually, large-scale light sculptures, projections, performances, installations, from a dozen world-class artists. Taking cues from light festivals around the globe, the inaugural Portland Winter Light Festival aims to bring people together during a time of year typically reserved for the indoors.

Who couldn’t use an inspiring spectacle to celebrate light, life and warmth in February? Bundle up!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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