Category Archives: Rider News

BIKETOWN is coming

We know from our work creating the TriMet Bike Plan that our riders care about and rely on bike access. When BIKETOWN, Portland’s public bike share system, makes its debut tomorrow, many riders will have a new option for connecting to transit. That it’s healthy, fun and convenient is icing on the cake.

How does BIKETOWN work?

Ride for a single trip ($2.50), an entire day ($12) or for a whole year with an annual membership ($12/month).

Unlock a ride at the station using the computer and keypad on the back of the bike, and you’re on your way.

When you’re done, lock up at the station — the smart bike will know that you’ve finished your ride.

We like bike share because it extends the reach of transit, making trips by bus or train more accessible to more people. It also helps to make one-way bike trips possible and reduces barriers to biking like ownership, storage, maintenance and concerns about theft.

BIKETOWN

I’m looking forward to hearing and seeing how riders combine trips between BIKETOWN and TriMet. Personally, I’m excited to use bike share for short trips, connections to daytime meetings, getting out of the office for lunch and running errands after work.

BIKETOWN

A few things about BIKETOWN I’d like to point out:

  • If you ride on the Transit Mall (5th and 6th avenues) in Downtown Portland, be sure to stay on the left side of the roadway in the shared lanes and bike lane on portions of SW 5th. Please stay out of the transit lane(s) on the right side of the roadway, as these spaces are only for buses and trains.
  • Don’t bring the bikes on board. One of the best things about bike share is that you only use it when you need it — just park or pick up a bike wherever you’re connecting to the bus or train. (Plus, it doesn’t make sense to pay for bike share time on top of your transit fare.)
  • When you end your ride, if the BIKETOWN station closest to your destination is full, you can lock your bike at a public bike rack close to the station marked with an orange sticker for no additional charge. If you lock your bike at a public bike rack further from a station, a $2 fee applies.
  • The bikes don’t come with helmets, so bring your own if you want one and you plan on riding that day. Keeping a helmet at the office might be a good idea if you plan on riding during the day.
  • Cross tracks straight on. Crossing tracks at an angle or turning across tracks is risky — your wheel can slip into the trackbed and result in a crash. When in doubt, walk your bike across the tracks and check out these safety tips for riding a bike around transit vehicles.
  • You can make money using BIKETOWN. A little bit, anyway: Members who spot bike share bikes locked at public racks will be rewarded with a $1 account credit for returning them to a station.
  • Sneaker Bikes!

BIKETOWN

There are 100 BIKETOWN stations, which means lots of overlap with transit in Portland — take a look at the service area and station map to see what your next trip might look like.

As BIKETOWN establishes itself, we’ll continue working with our partners to encourage smooth connections for transit and bike riders. We hope to see you on a bright orange bike soon!

Learn more about BIKETOWN

Jeff Owen

Jeff Owen

I’m TriMet’s active transportation planner. I work with our regional partners to improve conditions for combining transit trips with walking and biking, including sidewalks, crossings, trails, bikeways, and bike parking. Away from work, I can be found walking, riding my bike, hiking or cheering in the Timbers Army.

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Renewing our bus fleet

If you ride often, you know we have some old buses. The kind that make you feel like you’ve time-traveled to 1995, when multi-colored cloth patterns were kinda cool, the Blazers played in Memorial Coliseum and Portland’s own Everclear released “Santa Monica” to the world.

That era is fading away, however, as we’ve put 326 new buses on the road the past four years. All of our new buses have amenities such as vinyl seats, easy-to-read LED signs, better interior and exterior lighting and onboard GPS (which improves the accuracy of our TransitTracker) — features lacking in some of our older buses. And our entire active fleet now has essentials like air conditioning and low floors for easy boarding. (We’ll keep some of the older buses as backup.)

This past February, the first batch of 77 new diesel-powered buses (the 3500 series) took to the streets. By the end of the month, they’ll all be in service.

Our buses are getting more efficient in fuel consumption and emissions, led by eight hybrid buses, four of which have all-electric capabilities. We’ve also tested some fully electric buses, technology that’s quickly advancing and certainly something we’re considering for the future.

And we’re not finished. (Not even close.)

We’re getting 151 new buses in the next three years, which will help keep the average age of our fleet to an industry-standard eight years. This way, your next ride is less likely to remind you of the time before flip phones.

Learn more about the newest buses in our fleet

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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How We Roll Pop-Up Event [SLIDESHOW]

We took over Pioneer Courthouse Square yesterday afternoon to hand out fun stuff, play games, take pictures and say thanks to our awesome riders.

We loved seeing all the smiling faces — some of them might end up on our next wrapped bus or train!

View this slideshow on Flickr

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Line 97 will connect Tualatin and Sherwood!

Our friends in Tualatin and Sherwood have no excuse NOT to get together more often. On June 6, we’ll unveil our newest bus service — Line 97-Tualatin-Sherwood Rd — the first direct transit connection between the two towns. All aboard!

Line 97 will help connect people to jobs, shopping, services and more in these two growing communities. It also provides an alternative to driving and will ease congestion along the Tualatin-Sherwood corridor.

5-31-16 Line 97 (3 of 4)
Line 97-Tualatin-Sherwood is our newest bus line and the first direct transit connection between Tualatin and Sherwood.

The nine-mile round-trip journey will run every 30 minutes during weekday commuting hours. The bus’ first stop of the day is Tualatin’s WES Commuter Rail station at 6:20 a.m. It will then travel through downtown Tualatin, past industrial areas, the Sherwood Market Center, Sherwood Plaza and the new Parkway Village before making a return trip.

Line 97 will also connect you to other TriMet service. In addition to WES, you can link up with other bus lines such as Line 76-Beaverton/Tualatin, which serves Tigard and Beaverton, as well as Line 96-Tualatin/I-5, which goes into Downtown Portland or south to Commerce Circle in Wilsonville. Near the Sherwood Plaza stop, you can also transfer to Line 93-Tigard/Sherwood or Line 94-Pacific Hwy/Sherwood.

5-31-16 Line 97 (4 of 4)
This new bus service runs every 30 minutes during the weekday commuting hours and between the Tualatin WES Station and the Sherwood Plaza.

This is just the beginning of expanded service in this area. In the future, we plan to extend Line 97 to Bridgeport Village, the 72nd Avenue employment area, the Tigard Triangle and into downtown Tigard.

We’re thrilled to bring this new service to these communities. It’s a big part of our goal to bring more buses and trains — and better overall service — to Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah counties.

Learn more about Line 97-Tualatin-Sherwood and sign up for email alerts

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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Instagram Roundup: May

We reached 1,500 followers on Instagram in May — thanks to everyone who’s shared their transit photos with us and helped spread #GoByTransit!

Here are some of the sweet shots that inspired us this month:

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

#trimet #max #lightrail #transit #morninglight #mounthood #mthood #railway

A photo posted by We’ll Just See About That (@verstandinvictus) on

#pdx #portland #trimet #bus #bridge #hawthrone

A photo posted by JohnaMarie (@engagedtone) on

Till next time #PDX ✌🏻

A photo posted by Pokey (@the_pokey_life) on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Thanks for Your Patience During the First Avenue MAX Improvements

Asking you to avoid MAX for two weeks wasn’t easy. More than 100,000 rides are taken on a typical day — that’s a lot of people we hoped would consider taking the bus, biking, carpooling or working from home instead.

It’s the kind of thing we’d only do if we really had to — and for First Avenue, this was the case. We needed to replace critical sections of track and switches that had been in service since MAX opened in 1986, and the best way to do it was all at once. Unfortunately, that meant trains would have to be detoured around the project, adding pressure on everyone. Beyond the construction itself, we needed to communicate some complicated service messages to riders; in turn, many of you had to alter your commute and plan extra time.

We asked a lot but what you showed us was even more. The patience and cooperation you displayed was truly remarkable and deeply appreciated, and helped make a daunting project go even smoother than we hoped. Now we’re back and we’re better, and on track toward providing more reliable service.


 

Related:

MAX Reliability Improvements
Charting MAX On-Time Performance
• 1st Ave MAX Improvements Progress Reports: 1, 2, 3

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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What do you think of our Draft Bike Plan?

We’re currently creating the TriMet Bike Plan, a roadmap that will help guide future investments in biking infrastructure and amenities. This includes improving bike access to transit stops, expanding parking options, and accommodating bikes onboard buses and trains. The goal of the plan is to make bike+transit trips easier, safer and more convenient for more people.

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Biking helps to extend the reach of transit, making transit trips more accessible to more people. As the region grows and changes, we know our riders’ interest in connecting to transit by bike will grow.

This plan serves as a companion to our pedestrian access analysis from 2011. Though we don’t have direct control over sidewalks and bikeways, we recognize that if you can’t get to our bus stops and rail stations, you can’t benefit from our service, so good walking and biking connections are essential for our riders.

Weigh in: Whether you connect to bus, MAX or WES, or if you bike all the way to your destination, we want your feedback

With help from outside experts, we’ve drafted a plan that includes guidance from partners, including city and county leaders. This includes feedback from open houses, online outreach and rider comments. Of course, we also got input from our drivers. All of this was taken into account as we studied existing conditions, analyzed access to transit stations and stops, and studied best practices from other agencies around the country.

Feedback on a map at a Bike Plan open house

The plan includes recommendations for how to improve access to stations and stops, invest in bike parking improvements, and connect people with their community — all while easing traffic congestion and reducing air pollution. In the end, the goal is to make the Portland area a better place to live.

We’ll be taking your feedback through the end of the month and then finalizing the plan in June. So take a look at the plan, available for the next two weeks, and let us know what you think!

Jeff Owen

Jeff Owen

I’m TriMet’s active transportation planner. I work with our regional partners to improve conditions for combining transit trips with walking and biking, including sidewalks, crossings, trails, bikeways, and bike parking. Away from work, I can be found walking, riding my bike, hiking or cheering in the Timbers Army.

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