Category Archives: Service Updates

Hop Fastpass Has Arrived

Today’s the day — Hop Fastpass has arrived!

After years of development, installation and testing, our new electronic fare system is up and running. Now, riders can pay fare with just a tap — it’s that simple. Even better, we’ve introduced some huge new benefits to go along with Hop:

  • Earn passes and save as you ride. Gone are the days of choosing between single-ride tickets, day passes, week passes and month passes. Just tap every time you board, and Hop will only charge you up to the price of a day pass in a day. (Same goes for earning a month pass.) It’s a good deal for everyone.
  • Reload basically anywhere. Putting money on your card is quick and easy using the website, app or phone hotline, plus you can pay with cash at the store. For maximum convenience, set up Auto-Load to add money whenever your balance gets low and rest assured you’ll never be stuck without fare.
  • And starting soon, you’ll be able to use Hop without an actual card. (Woah.) The readers will accept mobile payments using Android Pay, Apple Pay or Samsung Pay, allowing you to pay Adult fare by simply tapping your phone. (Double woah.) You’ll even be able to earn day passes this way. (Triple woah.)

Ready to get a card? Find a nearby retailer or catch us at an event this summer. Happy tapping!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Thanks for Your Patience During the Morrison–Yamhill MAX Improvements

Three weeks was a lot to ask.

Indeed, the work we completed along Morrison and Yamhill streets in Downtown Portland was more intensive than the two MAX improvement projects that preceded it. Over the last three weeks, we replaced four sections of the original MAX alignment, making for a smoother, more reliable ride.

SW 11th Avenue in the early 1980s

The work at the SW 11th Avenue turnaround involved replacing deteriorating 30-year-old wooden rail ties with composite ties and concrete, installing new switch machines and increasing the size of the drains underneath them. (The switches on Morrison got their own heaters, too.) We also replaced the crumbling asphalt infill around the rails with rubberized grout, which will last significantly longer and do a better job of preventing movement.

SW 11th Ave. during the Morrison–Yamhill MAX Improvements

Upon digging up the old rails, we realized we could do more work on our signal system than we had initially scheduled, so we installed new cable, too.

More straightforward was the work at SW 1st Avenue, where we installed new curved rails and poured the rubberized grout. This section of track had been replaced in 1996, but since curved rail wears relatively quickly, this was a perfect opportunity to do it again without further disruption.

Pouring rubberized grout around the new rail on SW 1st Ave

Meanwhile at the closed stations between the work zones, crews did some deep cleaning. Lights were replaced, signs were spruced up and tiles were fixed along the platforms.

And throughout it all, our amazing riders — you — adapted and persevered. (An even more amazing feat considering the protests that took place on the first day of the new commute!) This time around, it was a lot harder to avoid transferring to and from shuttle buses. Some trips had to be radically reconfigured, and some riders chose to skip transit altogether and bike, walk or carpool instead.

Riders transferring to MAX shuttle buses on SW Yamhill St.

Although coordinating service around the disruption presented as much of a challenge as the construction itself, the patience and understanding you showed us helped make everything go smoothly. We can’t thank you enough for that.

Now we’re back, and we’re better than ever. See you out there!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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The Plan for Morrison-Yamhill

Spring is finally here and we’ll be digging in once again to make major improvements to sections of the original MAX tracks in Downtown Portland.

Like the projects we completed last year at 1st Avenue and Rose Quarter, the Morrison-Yamhill MAX Improvements project will impact service on all lines. But once they’re completed, these track and switch improvements will help us keep trains rolling smoothly and reliably.

The work will take three weeks, from April 30 through May 20. That’s a bit longer than the previous projects that took just two weeks each. The construction will temporarily alter Portland Streetcar in addition to disrupting MAX.

The heart of the project happens on SW Morrison and Yamhill streets at 11th Avenue, which was the end of the original MAX line between Portland and Gresham. This area sees it all: hundreds of trains and streetcars a day, three lanes of auto traffic, bicyclists and pedestrians.

SW 11th Avenue in the early 1980s.

Crews will replace four “turnouts” — two on Morrison Street and two on Yamhill Street. These are sections of track where rails spur off from the mainline to side tracks. Underneath the rails, crews will remove the old wooden ties that were standard at the time of original construction and replace them with concrete. New switches will go in with improved drainage to keep them clear of water and debris that can cause problems during heavy rain storms. On the Morrison side of 11th Avenue, the switches will get heaters to help keep snow and ice from building up, an especially good idea after last winter.

The original cable connecting the train signals to the track will also be replaced, and circuits that help monitor where trains are will be upgraded. These improvements will cut down on signal issues and keep trains moving.

Walking through these intersections today, you have to step carefully around broken and missing brick pavers and historic Portland Belgian block. We’ll replace those. The potholes caused by asphalt crumbling and pulling away from the rails will be repaired using a rubberized grout, which keeps the rail in place and prevents stray current as electricity from the overhead wire travels to the train and into the rail.

Down the street at 1st Avenue, crews will replace curved rail, which wears faster than straight rail. We’ll also be freshening up some signs at the closed platforms and working on our ticket machines.

The Morrison-Yamhill MAX Improvements project has been two years in the making. And since we know the three-week disruption to MAX service (and two-week disruption to Portland Streetcar) is going to be a big inconvenience, we’ve coordinated with other agencies to get all the disruptive work done at once. The Portland Bureau of Environmental Services will repair and upgrade sewers next to the tracks, Multnomah County will fix cracks under the Burnside Bridge and Portland Parks and Recreation will repair material under the Pioneer Square South MAX Station all at the same time our work is happening. We figured an intense three-week disruption is better than months of separate projects that block MAX.

We’re asking a lot from our riders during this project. We appreciate your patience and we can’t wait to debut smoother and more reliable MAX service next month.

Learn more about the Morrison-Yamhill MAX Improvements project
Sarah Touey

Sarah Touey

I’m the resident engineer for TriMet’s Maintenance of Way projects. I seek out adventure by traveling and exploring other transit systems across the country, spending time at the beach with family and friends, and continuously remodeling our house with my husband Jarrett.

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The Hop Fastpass Beta Test Has Begun

Today we launched the public beta test of Hop Fastpass and, for the first time, riders have begun paying with a fare card on buses and at rail stations.

It’s a small step in some ways — there are only 250 people in the first group of testers, and not all of Hop’s features have been implemented — but it marks a significant shift in the way our region uses transit. Hop is a thoroughly modern system designed to make paying fare easier and more convenient. Smart features like Auto-Load and the ability to earn passes mean riders simply tap and go, with no need to think about which type of fare to buy, and a robust retail network and cash compatibility make Hop accessible to everyone.

As our beta testers put Hop through its paces, we’ll see how these benefits work in real life. We’re looking forward to their feedback, which will help us prioritize the improvements we want to make before Hop officially launches this summer.

If you’re curious (or jealous) and want to try Hop sooner, sign up for emails at myhopcard.com. We’ll be adding beta testers every couple weeks and rolling out new features like single-use tickets, compatibility with mobile wallets like Apple Pay and Android Pay, and the official Hop app.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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How Transit Works in Snow and Ice

The National Weather Service recently confirmed what heavy rains have hinted at: La Niña is here.

Get ready for this.
Get ready for this.

Below-average temperatures and above-average rainfall — and perhaps snow and ice — have been observed in the Pacific Northwest this fall, and both could continue through the winter, according to NWS predictions.

What do you think when you hear this? Are you the type to buy a season pass to Mt. Hood Meadows, assured that the snowpack will stretch well into spring? Perhaps blankets and board games (and Netflix!) is more your thing. For us, preparation for the inevitability of snow and ice events has already begun.

Related: Learn your snow route

Making the Call

We value safety, so determining whether to alter service in a winter weather event is simple: If a situation is potentially unsafe for riders, operators or equipment, we take action.

Bus in snow

In practice, this means being ultra-aware of conditions across the system. To make this easier, we set up an Emergency Operations Center that’s staffed 24/7 during winter weather events, and allows us to streamline and speed up the process of gathering information, making decisions and disseminating information. (Activating an EOC during an emergency is standard practice across all types of agencies.)

We rely on and share information from the field and from regional partners like PBOT, ODOT and local media outlets. We track storms as they approach and coordinate with other agencies to plow and sand streets — we even have a few sanding trucks of our own to run on high elevation bus routes.

The Plan for Buses

Preparing buses for snow and ice often begins before service starts for the day. Specialized crews (affectionately known as “Snowbirds”) assess bus routes, specifically at high elevations, to see if they’re safe for normal bus operations. They might call for a sanding truck, put the line on snow route or cancel a run entirely.

Bus at curb in snow

Like other cars and trucks on the road, buses will often be chained if they’re running on snowy or icy streets. Just under half our buses have drop down “insta-chains,” which operators can deploy at the push of a button. (Otherwise, crews will chain the fleet at the garage or in the field, which takes just 10 or 15 minutes per bus, respectively.)

For riders, it’s important to keep in mind that chained buses travel slower — no faster than 25 mph — so they won’t stay on schedule. And in winter conditions your bus won’t pull up to the curb, lest it slide or become stuck. If that happens, we have rescue teams on standby to get it moving again.

MAX Service

MAX typically does well in snow, and we take measures to prevent ice buildup. Throughout the system, switches on the track are equipped with covers (some have heaters, too) and portions of the overhead wire have ice caps to keep ice at bay.

MAX in snow

The trains have pantograph heaters that are activated in snow and ice, and these also help prevent ice from accumulating. (The pantograph is the arm that connects the train to overhead power.) If necessary, we’ll run some trains overnight to keep ice from building up on the overhead wire. And if you’re at the station when one of these trains pulls up — for whatever reason, at whatever time — we’ll let you board!

If ice does begin to accumulate on the overhead wire, we have six MAX vehicles equipped with heated ice cutters on a second pantograph that can shave approximately 1/32 inch of ice off the wire with each pass.

Related: Tips for riding in winter weather

What You Need to Know

We’ve already mentioned that your bus will likely be late and perhaps on a different route (learn yours!) during snow and ice. If it gets too far off its normal schedule, we’ll turn off TransitTracker so estimated arrival times (which aren’t accurate when buses are traveling slower) become approximate distances — much more useful for planning your trip.

But don’t assume that snow means your bus is on snow route. We often need to alter service in the face of unpredictable weather, so instead check with us for updates on your lines: You’ll find service alerts and snow route updates at trimet.org/alerts, on Twitter and through our email list.

people in snow

Aside from checking your bus or train’s status before starting your trip, make sure your phone is charged and that you have water and warm clothing — don’t forget gloves and a hat. Leave plenty of time to walk to your stop or station and be extra careful on slopes. We (and our regional partners) do our best to de-ice roads, bridges, garages, platforms and parking lots, but you’ll likely find some slippery spots along the way. And if your bus stop is on a hill, head to the top or bottom to board — the bus can’t safely stop on a slope.

Finally, don’t approach the bus until it comes to a complete stop and the driver opens the door. There’s always a chance it could slide toward the curb once the brakes have locked the wheels.

If we’re faced with severe weather, we might need to reduce service to certain bus lines running on plowed streets. The idea is that by reassigning buses where they are most useful and less likely to get stuck, we can serve more riders.

As we mentioned at the top, our goal is to keep everyone safe. So even as things slow down, know that there’s a lot going on behind the scenes to coordinate safe travel in difficult circumstances. Winter weather requires extra effort from all of us, and we appreciate your trust, patience and preparedness when the time comes.

Which reminds us: Have you learned your snow route?

 

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Thanks for Your Patience During the Rose Quarter MAX Improvements

Like we mentioned in our Rose Quarter Progress Report, the MAX improvements work this time around was much more complicated — and disruptive — than the First Avenue project from May.

Crews replaced and upgraded tracks, signals, switches and more around the Rose Quarter Transit Center.
Crews replaced and upgraded tracks, signals, switches and more around the Rose Quarter Transit Center.

Over the last two weeks, as we installed upgraded track, signals and switches near the Rose Quarter Transit Center, many riders became very familiar with the Lloyd Center–Rose Quarter shuttle buses. These were our best option for replacing the service between the three closed MAX stations, though they made for a disjointed commute.

Shuttle buses carried MAX riders between the Rose Quarter and Lloyd Center stations.
Shuttle buses carried MAX riders between the Rose Quarter and Lloyd Center stations, and between Kenton and Portland International Airport.

For others, the commute just became longer, as trains arrived less frequently (and more packed than usual). Finally, some chose to do something altogether different and took the bus, biked or shared a ride instead.

(We should also mention that the Kenton–PDX shuttle became an unexpected highlight of the project — thanks for all the positive feedback!)

In the end, nearly everyone had to plan for an altered commute.

Volunteer Ride Guides and Customer Service staff helped riders get around the Rose Quarter construction.

We asked a lot from you — more than ever — and throughout it all, your patience and understanding shone through. This attitude allowed us to focus on improving the 30-year-old trackway at the Rose Quarter safely and efficiently.

Here’s to you, and to a more reliable ride for decades to come!


 

Related:

MAX Reliability Improvements
Charting MAX On-Time Performance
• Rose Quarter MAX Improvements Progress Reports: 1, 2

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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The Plan For Rose Quarter

From Sunday, August 21, to Saturday, September 3, we’re making improvements near the Rose Quarter to improve MAX reliability and make for a smoother ride.

Much like the work we completed along 1st Avenue in May, we’ll be replacing switches and improving the tracks just east of the Rose Quarter MAX Station. Switches in this area are 30 years old, so crews will replace the wooden ties (which were standard back in 1985) underneath the switches with a concrete track structure and much more durable and robust materials.

We’ll also realign the section of track that runs westbound into the Rose Quarter MAX Station. We’ll begin by removing the rails and that run into the old Trolley Barn. Then, we’ll smooth out the curve into the north platform, which will create a smoother ride into the station. This new design will help eliminate some long-term maintenance challenges and reduce wear and tear on the tracks. As part of the realignment, crews will adjust the overhead wire and relocate two existing poles.

We’ll also be updating the antiquated MAX signal system in the Rose Quarter area. Signal technology has improved dramatically since these were installed back in 1986. This will be the first time in MAX’s history that we’re upgrading the original signals — it’s kind of like rewiring part of your house. We’re most excited for this upgrade because it will decrease the chances of a signal malfunction, which causes train delays.

All of these much-needed renovations are to improve MAX reliability and keep trains running on time, but this work will disrupt regular MAX service for two weeks as we’ll have to shut down service along Holladay Street between the Rose Quarter and the Lloyd Center/NE 11th Ave MAX Station.

We know this two-week disruption will be a hassle, but it’s all for a good cause — to create a better and smoother ride for you.

Learn more about this MAX disruption and how your trips will be affected

Sarah Touey

Sarah Touey

I’m the resident engineer for TriMet’s Maintenance of Way projects. I seek out adventure by traveling and exploring other transit systems across the country, spending time at the beach with family and friends, and continuously remodeling our house with my husband Jarrett.

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