Category Archives: Tech Talk

The Hop Fastpass Beta Test Has Begun

Today we launched the public beta test of Hop Fastpass and, for the first time, riders have begun paying with a fare card on buses and at rail stations.

It’s a small step in some ways — there are only 250 people in the first group of testers, and not all of Hop’s features have been implemented — but it marks a significant shift in the way our region uses transit. Hop is a thoroughly modern system designed to make paying fare easier and more convenient. Smart features like Auto-Load and the ability to earn passes mean riders simply tap and go, with no need to think about which type of fare to buy, and a robust retail network and cash compatibility make Hop accessible to everyone.

As our beta testers put Hop through its paces, we’ll see how these benefits work in real life. We’re looking forward to their feedback, which will help us prioritize the improvements we want to make before Hop officially launches this summer.

If you’re curious (or jealous) and want to try Hop sooner, sign up for emails at myhopcard.com. We’ll be adding beta testers every couple weeks and rolling out new features like single-use tickets, compatibility with mobile wallets like Apple Pay and Android Pay, and the official Hop app.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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The TriMet Tickets app now connects you with more transportation options

A new feature is now included in your TriMet Tickets mobile app that allows you to easily connect with other transportation options nearby, including Lyft and car2go.

The idea is to keep you moving and help you connect to transit — sometimes you just need a ride that first mile to the station, or the last mile home from the bus stop. And in the future, we plan to add more services, such as BIKETOWN bike sharing.

How to use it

First, download the latest version of our TriMet Tickets app.

Then, tap the navigation drawer in the top-left corner of the screen and select “More Rides Nearby.” The transportation options closest to you will appear. Swipe left or right to toggle back and forth between the options.

More Rides Nearby

Finally, select your ride and you’re done! Easy, right?

Discounts during MAX disruptions May 8-21

With our 1st Avenue MAX Improvements project beginning this Sunday, May 8, the timing of this update couldn’t be better. For two weeks, MAX Blue, Green and Red lines will be disrupted and all MAX lines will run on reduced frequency. Fortunately, our friends at Lyft and car2go are providing discounts to riders through the TriMet Tickets app.

New Lyft users can enter code “FIRSTAVE” for $5 off their first 10 rides through the app. Existing users can enter code “LTMP16” for 20 percent off a Lyft ride. (The offer for current Lyft members is valid for the first 1,000 people who claim it — hurry up!)

Meanwhile, car2go is offering new members free registration and 15 minutes of drive time with promotion code “C2G15” (allow five to seven days for car2go membership activation). For existing car2go members, spend $100 in drive time in May 2016 and receive 20 minutes drive time for free. To redeem, email your membership information to portland@car2go.com.

More Lyft drivers and car2go vehicles will be positioned near high-traffic transit stations throughout the metro area to help you get where you need to go during this huge construction project.

We hope you can take advantage of these discounts during the service disruption. And we’d love to hear what you think about the new app feature! Drop us a line at trimet.org/feedback.

Download the latest version of the TriMet Tickets app here.

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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The Plan for First Avenue

We’ve made a big fuss about how the upcoming First Avenue improvements could make for a difficult commute over the next couple weeks, and you’re probably wondering what on earth could possibly create such chaos.

When we say improving, we’re talking about demolishing, replacing, flushing, installing, repairing and upgrading — below, you’ll find insight into what exactly we’ll be doing over the next couple weeks.

Early in the morning on Sunday, May 8, crews will begin saw-cutting around the portions of track that are being removed on First Avenue. Work has already started at Elmonica, our rail maintenance facility in Beaverton, to prepare the rails that will replace these sections.

Rails are being prepared for installation along First Avenue.
Rails are being prepared for installation along First Avenue.

Once the cutting is done, we’ll begin demolition of the trackway under the Morrison Bridge. This involves removal of rails, switch machines, wooden ties and salvageable cobblestone from around the switches. (Why that last one? The City of Portland has required us to replace the cobblestone when we’re done.) A few days in, the same demo work happens at NW 1st & Couch. Once the prep work is done at both locations, we’ll install new materials like track, switch machines, conduit, rebar and a new isolation membrane that guards against stray currents.

We'll be replacing track and switches like this — which are part of the original, 30-year-old MAX alignment — along First Avenue.
We’ll be replacing track and switches like this — part of the original, 30-year-old MAX alignment — along First Avenue.

Once everything is in place, we’ll align the rails to assure they are the right distance apart and check their vertical and horizontal placement. Then the concrete will be poured, first under the Morrison Bridge and later at Couch.

During the second week, we’ll begin the third major project near Skidmore Fountain. The curved section of rail here wears quicker than straight track and will be replaced. This part of the project should take about five days.

The curved section of track near the Skidmore Fountain will be replaced.
The curved section of track near the Skidmore Fountain will be replaced.

Final cleanup of the trackway should be complete by Saturday, May 21, but surfacing on First Avenue — including putting those cobblestones back in — could continue through May 27.

While all this track work is going on, some of our other crews will have a good opportunity to make some other improvements along First Avenue — a sort of silver lining to an otherwise very disruptive project. Maintenance crews will be able to flush and improved drainage under the Morrison Bridge (we don’t need to tell you why this is important), track drains will be cleaned, hardware on the overhead wire will be replaced and the feeder breaker at the Morrison Bridge substation will be retrofitted.

While track work is being done, other crews will have a chance to make repairs.
While track work is being done, other crews will have a chance to make repairs.

We’ll also be repairing and improving the surface alongside the rails that will benefit all street users. (Cyclists who make the bumpy crossing at Couch will be especially happy.) These projects may be supplementary to the track work but they’re critical to the bigger picture along First Avenue: We’re going all-in on these improvements, because that’s the smartest way to give our riders more reliable service into the future.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Hop Fastpass Will Change the Way You Pay Fare — If You Want It To

When it makes its debut next year, Hop Fastpass™ will change the way many of us ride transit. It will be a convenient option for lots of riders, allowing them to pay their way toward a daily or monthly pass, protect their balance even if they lose their card, and automatically reload funds so they’re never stuck without fare. But rest assured, you can always pay with cash, too.

We’re introducing Hop Fastpass as another option for TriMet, C-TRAN and Portland Streetcar riders — one that many have been dreaming of for years. (Electronic fare systems have been hugely successful in leading transit cities around the world.)

We’ve designed Hop Fastpass to be inclusive and accessible, but you don’t have to use it. You’ll still be able to pay with cash or purchase fares at ticket vending machines or on board buses, just like today. We want to make this clear, especially after seeing some inaccurate information floating around lately.

We do have programs to benefit low-income riders

The benefits of affordable transit are undeniable, and we’re on board. We lowered the cost of Youth fares to $1.25 back in 2014, which helps make transit more affordable for students and low-income families.  We also have $1.5 million dedicated to two programs that provide free or reduced-cost fares to non-profits and community-based organizations that serve low-income individuals and families. These groups are then able to offer fares as part of a suite of services for their clients.

For the many low-income families and individuals who ride frequently, Hop Fastpass offers a great advantage over paper tickets: the pay-as-you-go pass. This allows riders to pay towards a 1-Month Pass in increments as small as $5 – once they’ve paid the equivalent of a monthly pass, the rest of the rides are free that month. This eliminates the upfront cost of a pass while making its significant discount more accessible.

We’re (really) expanding our retail network

Right now, riders can purchase fare from about 130 retailers throughout the service area; with Hop Fastpass, there will be about 500 fare outlets. In the future, Hop Fastpass fare can also be loaded online, using a smartphone app, by phone and at our ticket offices.

And remember: You can always pay fare in cash on buses and at MAX stations.

Each rider needs their own card, but one person can manage multiple accounts

Lots of riders travel in groups, like families or classes, which is why Hop Fastpass will allow one rider to manage multiple accounts. Each rider age 7 and older will need their own card to use Hop Fastpass (just like each needs separate fare today).

Plus, there’s a big benefit to using individual cards: It will allow us to offer pay-as-you-go passes. Pay for two 2½-Hour Tickets in a day and ride free until the end of service; pay the equivalent of a monthly pass in one month and ride free until the next month. This extends the value of passes to more riders, without the upfront cost.

To kick things off, we’ll be giving out about 200,000 free cards, many of which will be available to low-income riders. Otherwise there will be a one-time $3 charge for a new Hop Fastpass card, which is designed to last for up to 10 years. The low card fee (which, when taking advantage of balance protection available with a Hop Fastpass card, is less than the cost of losing a single 1-Day Pass) will help us maintain a wide-reaching and convenient retail network.

crop53 (1 of 1)

You’ll know when you’re running low

The theme of Hop Fastpass is convenience, and that means not having to worry about your account balance. The easiest thing to do is set it and forget it — register your account and activate automatic reloading, so you’re never stuck without fare. But even if you don’t do this, you can always check your balance online, using the app or by phone. And if your balance is running low, you’ll get an alert when you tap on board. And if you don’t have money on your Hop Fastpass card, you can always pay with cash on the bus or at the train station.

Your personal information remains private

Hop Fastpass users’ credit or debit card information will be assigned secure, randomly generated alphanumeric tokens. Cybersource, owned by Visa, will handle all the payment processing for Hop Fastpass and will marry the digital tokens with the corresponding credit or debit card numbers.

Your personal information is safe, too — in fact, we’ll allow you to register your Hop Fastpass account using a four-digit security PIN that you create. We’ll tally the taps on your card to make sure you’re charged the correct fare and to cap your fares once you’ve paid the equivalent of a daily or monthly pass.

We want to know what you think

We know our riders want an electronic fare system, and we want Hop Fastpass to work for as many people as possible. We’ve welcomed public input every step of the way, and we’ll continue to share our progress and listen to riders before, during and after the system makes its debut.

Send us a note or sign up for email updates about Hop Fastpass (especially if you’re interested in the chance to become a beta tester) or to learn about upcoming public meetings and hearings.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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How It Works: Tilikum Crossing Art Lights

By now you’ve seen how Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, lights up the night — but how exactly do those lights work?

There are 178 LED lights aesthetically placed on 40 bridge cables, the four transmission towers above and below the deck, and on the Sonic Dish artwork along the Eastside Esplanade and future Willamette Greenway at the ends of the bridge.

Monitors from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, located in the water near the Morrison Bridge, collect data from the Willamette River. A program developed by digital artist Morgan Barnard translates the data into a colorful and aesthetic display.

(Video: December 2014 Testing)

The temperature of the river controls the color of the lights. Warmer river conditions will display warmer colors, like orange and yellow, while cooler temperatures will display cool colors, like green and blue.

Tilikum Crossing in September (Photo Courtesy: Victor von Salza)
Tilikum Crossing in September (Photo Courtesy: Victor von Salza)
Flickr
Tilikum Crossing in November (Photo Courtesy: Sky Schemer)

Notice how the lights seem to dance across Tilikum Crossing? That’s controlled by the tide. When the tide is coming in, the lights move towards the center of the bridge. As the tide goes out, the lights move towards the ends of the bridge. Additionally, the tide levels affect the speed of the lights. When the tide is higher or lower, the lights move faster. At midpoint, the lights move slowly.

Video Credit: Mike Warner

The speed of the river controls how quickly the colors change. If the river is moving fast, the colors will appear to move and cycle through quicker.

The river’s height affects the contrast in the lights. The higher the river, the more contrasted the colors appear, which affects the pattern and movement of the lights. This change varies with the season, so in the summer (when the river levels are pretty static) the bridge color will appear even and bright. In the spring, when the water tends to move more, the bridge colors will appear more fluid.

While a lot of scientific data is gathered to create this aesthetic light display, the bridge lights aren’t meant to serve as a weather tool. The artists, the late Anna Valentina Murch and Douglas Hollis, wanted these lights to represent a dialogue between the Willamette River and Tilikum Crossing — quite a poetic way to look at the lights, don’t you think?

Learn more about Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People

Learn more about our Public Art Program

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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First batch of new buses take to the streets

3500 buses (4 of 7)

For the fifth year in a row, we’re getting new buses for our riders—making your trips more comfortable, safe and reliable. As part of our ongoing bus replacement program, we’re adding 77 new diesel-powered buses to our fleet over the next several months! (Cue the cartwheels and back flips.)

You might see one of these new 3500-series buses — 10 of them will be on city streets this week. In the next few months, five more buses will arrive every week from the Gillig factory in Hayward, Calif., as we gradually place them into service.

Once we receive them from the factory, it can take up to a month to get a bus road-ready. We need to install fare boxes, exterior mirrors and radio systems, check the engine and air systems, perform road tests, and get licenses and paperwork approved by DMV.

All 77 are expected to be rolling throughout the metro area by the end of May. They join the 249 other “new” buses we’ve put on the streets since 2012.

Outside of being shiny and new, you won’t notice any big differences compared to the buses we’ve purchased the past few years. Like their recent predecessors, they’ll all have air conditioning, automatic stop announcements, an upgraded dispatch system for improved customer information, easy-to-clean vinyl seats, anti-microbial interior surfaces and low floors (which makes it easier to board). In fact, all of our regular-service buses will have low floors by the end of 2017!

The new buses cost about $470,000 each. Most of them will be housed at the Center Street Garage in SE Portland.

Younger fleet

We began our bus replacement program in 2012. By summer, we’ll have 326 newer buses on the road. About two years ago, the average age of TriMet’s fleet was 12 years. Once all the 3500s are in the regular rotation this spring, we’ll be very close to the industry average of eight years (Woohoo!).

Some buses in our fleet, such as the series 2200, 2100 and 2000s, have been running since President Clinton’s first term. They’ll stick around a short while longer for backup.

What’s next

We’re not done upgrading our bus fleet. We plan to acquire 50 more in fiscal year 2017, 57 the next year and 70 the year after that. It’s part of our commitment to bring more service to you — and make sure you get to your destination safely and comfortably.

Want to drive a bus? We’re hiring bus operators!

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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Say hello to Hop Fastpass

It’s great to have options — especially when it comes to transportation.

That’s why we designed Hop Fastpass™, the new electronic fare system arriving in 2017, with flexibility in mind. Hop Fastpass will work with a fare card, smartphone (using our app or services like Apple Pay, Android Pay and likely Samsung Pay) or your credit/debit card. Plus it can get you aboard TriMet, C-TRAN and Portland Streetcar. How’s that for choices?

Say hello to HopHop will make paying your fare easier, faster and more convenient!myhopcard.comHere’s how it’ll work:

Posted by TriMet on Thursday, September 24, 2015

 

How it will work
  1. Get Hop Fastpass. We’re expanding our retail network by leaps and bounds, so you’ll be able to find Hop cards at 500 neighborhood markets, grocery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies — just look in the gift card rack.
  2. Load value. You can add funds to your Hop Fastpass card anytime via myhopcard.com, using the smartphone app, at transit ticket offices or a participating retailer. Or just give us a call!
  3. Register your card (recommended). Sign up online or over the phone to get all the benefits of Hop Fastpass and to make sure your balance is protected in case you lose your card. You can even have funds auto-load when your balance is running low.
  4. Tap and go! Just touch your card to the Hop Fastpass reader on board the bus/Streetcar or at the MAX/WES platform, and you’re on your way!
We think you’ll love it

If you’ve ever used e-fare systems on transit in other cities, like ORCA in Washington or the Clipper Card in the Bay Area, you probably know about the benefits of going contactless. Once you’ve registered your Hop Fastpass card you’ll be able to manage your account and set up features like automatic reloading — a worry-free option that means your card won’t run out of fare.

Hop Fastpass can also save you money (especially if you’re a frequent rider). You’ll be able to pay your way toward a monthly pass, one ride at a time — if you commute more than 20 days that month (or fewer if you’re paying Youth or Honored Citizen fares), you’ll ride free until the next month, but you’ll never pay for rides you don’t use.

TriMet Tickets app users know about the luxury of going cash-free, which will continue with Hop Fastpass. (No more searching for exact change or crumpled paper tickets!) We’ll still accept cash on buses, MAX platform ticket machines and the Portland Streetcar — remember, it’s all about options.

hop1

It’s for everyone

Regular riders might get the most out of Hop Fastpass, but there’s something in it for everyone. Features like lost-card protection mean your balance is safe even if your card goes missing, and automatic reloading will even benefit infrequent riders when they don’t have to worry about a low balance. Riders without bank accounts can use Hop, too, and manage their fare card using cash at the 500 stores in our retail network.

Used to getting a pass through work or school? Hop Fastpass cards will be available for employers and institutions, too.

By now you’ve probably started to think about how you’ll use Hop Fastpass, and you’ve probably got some questions. Head over to myhopcard.com to learn more about how it will work and sign up for email updates (especially if you’re interested in being a beta tester).

Chris Tucker

Chris Tucker

As Director of Revenue Operations, I lead our agency’s efforts to modernize our fare collection systems. My goal is to provide excellent and efficient service while maintaining reliable, easy-to-use equipment.

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