Category Archives: Trip Tools

Hop Fastpass Will Change the Way You Pay Fare — If You Want It To

When it makes its debut next year, Hop Fastpass™ will change the way many of us ride transit. It will be a convenient option for lots of riders, allowing them to pay their way toward a daily or monthly pass, protect their balance even if they lose their card, and automatically reload funds so they’re never stuck without fare. But rest assured, you can always pay with cash, too.

We’re introducing Hop Fastpass as another option for TriMet, C-TRAN and Portland Streetcar riders — one that many have been dreaming of for years. (Electronic fare systems have been hugely successful in leading transit cities around the world.)

We’ve designed Hop Fastpass to be inclusive and accessible, but you don’t have to use it. You’ll still be able to pay with cash or purchase fares at ticket vending machines or on board buses, just like today. We want to make this clear, especially after seeing some inaccurate information floating around lately.

We do have programs to benefit low-income riders

The benefits of affordable transit are undeniable, and we’re on board. We lowered the cost of Youth fares to $1.25 back in 2014, which helps make transit more affordable for students and low-income families.  We also have $1.5 million dedicated to two programs that provide free or reduced-cost fares to non-profits and community-based organizations that serve low-income individuals and families. These groups are then able to offer fares as part of a suite of services for their clients.

For the many low-income families and individuals who ride frequently, Hop Fastpass offers a great advantage over paper tickets: the pay-as-you-go pass. This allows riders to pay towards a 1-Month Pass in increments as small as $5 – once they’ve paid the equivalent of a monthly pass, the rest of the rides are free that month. This eliminates the upfront cost of a pass while making its significant discount more accessible.

We’re (really) expanding our retail network

Right now, riders can purchase fare from about 130 retailers throughout the service area; with Hop Fastpass, there will be about 500 fare outlets. In the future, Hop Fastpass fare can also be loaded online, using a smartphone app, by phone and at our ticket offices.

And remember: You can always pay fare in cash on buses and at MAX stations.

Each rider needs their own card, but one person can manage multiple accounts

Lots of riders travel in groups, like families or classes, which is why Hop Fastpass will allow one rider to manage multiple accounts. Each rider age 7 and older will need their own card to use Hop Fastpass (just like each needs separate fare today).

Plus, there’s a big benefit to using individual cards: It will allow us to offer pay-as-you-go passes. Pay for two 2½-Hour Tickets in a day and ride free until the end of service; pay the equivalent of a monthly pass in one month and ride free until the next month. This extends the value of passes to more riders, without the upfront cost.

To kick things off, we’ll be giving out about 200,000 free cards, many of which will be available to low-income riders. Otherwise there will be a one-time $3 charge for a new Hop Fastpass card, which is designed to last for up to 10 years. The low card fee (which, when taking advantage of balance protection available with a Hop Fastpass card, is less than the cost of losing a single 1-Day Pass) will help us maintain a wide-reaching and convenient retail network.

crop53 (1 of 1)

You’ll know when you’re running low

The theme of Hop Fastpass is convenience, and that means not having to worry about your account balance. The easiest thing to do is set it and forget it — register your account and activate automatic reloading, so you’re never stuck without fare. But even if you don’t do this, you can always check your balance online, using the app or by phone. And if your balance is running low, you’ll get an alert when you tap on board. And if you don’t have money on your Hop Fastpass card, you can always pay with cash on the bus or at the train station.

Your personal information remains private

Hop Fastpass users’ credit or debit card information will be assigned secure, randomly generated alphanumeric tokens. Cybersource, owned by Visa, will handle all the payment processing for Hop Fastpass and will marry the digital tokens with the corresponding credit or debit card numbers.

Your personal information is safe, too — in fact, we’ll allow you to register your Hop Fastpass account using a four-digit security PIN that you create. We’ll tally the taps on your card to make sure you’re charged the correct fare and to cap your fares once you’ve paid the equivalent of a daily or monthly pass.

We want to know what you think

We know our riders want an electronic fare system, and we want Hop Fastpass to work for as many people as possible. We’ve welcomed public input every step of the way, and we’ll continue to share our progress and listen to riders before, during and after the system makes its debut.

Send us a note or sign up for email updates about Hop Fastpass (especially if you’re interested in the chance to become a beta tester) or to learn about upcoming public meetings and hearings.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Specialist. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

More Posts

Say hello to Hop Fastpass

It’s great to have options — especially when it comes to transportation.

That’s why we designed Hop Fastpass™, the new electronic fare system arriving in 2017, with flexibility in mind. Hop Fastpass will work with a fare card, smartphone (using our app or services like Apple Pay, Android Pay and likely Samsung Pay) or your credit/debit card. Plus it can get you aboard TriMet, C-TRAN and Portland Streetcar. How’s that for choices?

Say hello to HopHop will make paying your fare easier, faster and more convenient!myhopcard.comHere’s how it’ll work:

Posted by TriMet on Thursday, September 24, 2015

 

How it will work
  1. Get Hop Fastpass. We’re expanding our retail network by leaps and bounds, so you’ll be able to find Hop cards at 500 neighborhood markets, grocery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies — just look in the gift card rack.
  2. Load value. You can add funds to your Hop Fastpass card anytime via myhopcard.com, using the smartphone app, at transit ticket offices or a participating retailer. Or just give us a call!
  3. Register your card (recommended). Sign up online or over the phone to get all the benefits of Hop Fastpass and to make sure your balance is protected in case you lose your card. You can even have funds auto-load when your balance is running low.
  4. Tap and go! Just touch your card to the Hop Fastpass reader on board the bus/Streetcar or at the MAX/WES platform, and you’re on your way!
We think you’ll love it

If you’ve ever used e-fare systems on transit in other cities, like ORCA in Washington or the Clipper Card in the Bay Area, you probably know about the benefits of going contactless. Once you’ve registered your Hop Fastpass card you’ll be able to manage your account and set up features like automatic reloading — a worry-free option that means your card won’t run out of fare.

Hop Fastpass can also save you money (especially if you’re a frequent rider). You’ll be able to pay your way toward a monthly pass, one ride at a time — if you commute more than 20 days that month (or fewer if you’re paying Youth or Honored Citizen fares), you’ll ride free until the next month, but you’ll never pay for rides you don’t use.

TriMet Tickets app users know about the luxury of going cash-free, which will continue with Hop Fastpass. (No more searching for exact change or crumpled paper tickets!) We’ll still accept cash on buses, MAX platform ticket machines and the Portland Streetcar — remember, it’s all about options.

hop1

It’s for everyone

Regular riders might get the most out of Hop Fastpass, but there’s something in it for everyone. Features like lost-card protection mean your balance is safe even if your card goes missing, and automatic reloading will even benefit infrequent riders when they don’t have to worry about a low balance. Riders without bank accounts can use Hop, too, and manage their fare card using cash at the 500 stores in our retail network.

Used to getting a pass through work or school? Hop Fastpass cards will be available for employers and institutions, too.

By now you’ve probably started to think about how you’ll use Hop Fastpass, and you’ve probably got some questions. Head over to myhopcard.com to learn more about how it will work and sign up for email updates (especially if you’re interested in being a beta tester).

Chris Tucker

Chris Tucker

As Director of Revenue Operations, I lead our agency’s efforts to modernize our fare collection systems. My goal is to provide excellent and efficient service while maintaining reliable, easy-to-use equipment.

More Posts

TriMet Tickets app users: Be sure to recall tickets before switching phones

blog phoneAre you using the TriMet Tickets app? Plan to purchase a new phone this holiday season? Make sure to recall your tickets from your old phone to your online account first, so you don’t accidentally lose any tickets.

Your tickets are stored on your phone (which makes it possible to use them without an Internet connection), so you’ll need to transfer your tickets from your phone onto your online account before shutting off the network connection to your old phone. Here’s how to recall your tickets:

  1. When your old device is still connected to the network, login to your TriMet Tickets online account.
  2. Go to the “My Account” tab, then to “My Tickets” and click the “Recall Tickets” button.
  3. On your old device, go to the “My Tickets” tab and refresh. You should see your tickets moved.
  4. When you get your new phone, open up your TriMet Tickets app and sign in.
  5. Go to the “My Tickets” tab and refresh to download your tickets.

Note: We recently added the ability to recall or move active multi-day tickets—such as 7-Day, 14-Day and 30-Day tickets—from your phone to your account and back again. (In the past, only unused tickets could be moved.) Active tickets can be transferred to your account and back to the phone one time.

If you experience any problems during your upgrade, please contact the TriMet Tickets Help Desk at mobiletickethelp@trimet.org. We’re here to help!

Open data is making transit better, one app at a time

John Canfield
John Canfield’s start-up, Nimbler, just launched its fourth transit app.

John Canfield is the Founder of Nimbler and the VP of Risk Management at WePay. John previously worked at eBay, Zip2 and Creative Labs. John has a masters degree in electrical engineering from MIT and an MBA from Stanford.

I have been in the high-tech industry my whole career, working in start-ups and large tech companies. Over the years, the hot areas of innovation have shifted from the computers themselves, to packaged software, to the Internet, to mobile devices.

But I never heard people talking about transportation being a hot area of innovation until this last year.

Millennials are leading us away from the car-dominated America of past generations. They are looking for options. Start-ups and established players are offering an array new services — carsharing, bikesharing, ridesharing, and transportation apps of every sort.

Transit agencies are offering real-time arrival times so riders can find the best route and get there with a minimum of waiting. Uber, a five-year old start-up, just was valued at $18 billion — one of the highest private valuations ever. Venture capitalists around the world are taking notice.

The Portland area plays a special part in this transportation innovation. In 2005, an engineer at Google started working on a skunkworks project to build transit directions into Google Maps.

The big problem was where to get the data. Transit agencies had schedule data in proprietary systems that varied widely from agency to agency. Even if the data were technically accessible, many transit agencies did not want to publish it for free.

TriMet had a different approach. They proactively reached out to Google looking to partner. The result was the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS), which is used to communicate schedule data.

Google launched its transit directions in Portland first. Now, Google and other apps offer transit directions around the world using GTFS.

TriMet also innovated by investing in open-source trip planning. Traditionally, when transit agencies wanted a trip planner for their website, they worked with private software companies to build one just for their agency. TriMet instead started a project in 2009 with OpenPlans to build an Open Trip Planner for the Portland area that combines bike and transit directions.

The start-up I founded, Nimbler, just introduced its fourth transit app: Nimbler Portland. At the heart of Nimbler’s routing lies Open Trip Planner and GTFS. Nimbler offers transit directions, bike directions and combinations of the two. Nimbler also integrates with TriMet’s real-time vehicle location feed to provide real-time arrival predictions that minimize wait time.

Without the innovative approach of TriMet working with Google, OpenPlans and Open Street Maps, apps like Nimbler would not be possible. Because of TriMet’s leadership, apps around the world are benefiting and innovating using open source and open data for transportation.

9 new apps in the TriMet App Center

Transit apps on phonesHave you visited our App Center lately? We just added nine new apps for riders, all created by independent programmers using our open data. Thanks to these developers, TriMet riders have a variety of helpful trip tools available to help make their transit trips easier.

Check out the latest apps, all of which are free of charge:

  • Nimbler: Searches for nearest stops, provides arrival information, displays a map and vehicles on map. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad
  • RideScout: Plans and compares transportation options. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android
  • Acehopper: Provides schedules and real-time information. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android
  • Walk Score: Provides transit scores and locates walkable apartments near public transit. For web browsers
  • TripGo: Plans transit trips. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android, web browsers
  • PortlandBus: Searches for stops, provides arrival information, displays a map, plans transit trips, shows real-time traffic cameras. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android
  • Search Playground: Open-search tool for quickly finding arrival times and route info and planning trips from the browser search tool. For web browsers
  • Smart Ride: Searches for nearest stops, provides arrival information, displays a map, plans transit trips. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad
  • efoBus: Searches for stops, provides arrival information, displays a map, plans transit trips. For iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android

We invite you to take these new apps out for a spin. And be sure to let the developers know how they work for you. They’d really appreciate your feedback!

See the complete list of transit apps available in the TriMet App Center

Note: These aren’t “official” TriMet products, so we don’t endorse, warrant or support any of the applications listed here. We tested them initially to make sure they work, but they are provided as-is. 

Bibiana McHugh

I have worked in TriMet’s Information Technology Department since 1997 and currently lead a team of innovative web developers and analysts as the IT Manager of Geographic Information Systems and Location-Based Services. I lead several open data and open source software initiatives including opentripplanner.org, maps.trimet.org, rtp.trimet.org, developer.trimet.org, trimet.org/apps. After initiating collaboration with Google for the first release of Google Transit, I helped pioneer the now worldwide standard General Transit Feed Spec (GTFS). I received my degree in Geography from the University of Kansas.

More Posts

TransitTracker now shows “canceled” buses

TransitTracker on m.trimet.org showing canceled bus.
   TransitTracker on m.trimet.org showing canceled bus.

It already does a decent job of telling you if your bus is running late. Now, when the bus is not coming at all for some reason, TransitTracker can let you know.

Starting Monday, May 19, you’ll notice TransitTracker reporting some arrivals as “canceled.” We’re testing a feature of our new bus dispatch system that should make TransitTracker a lot more reliable when it comes to reporting canceled buses.

It’s important to know if the bus isn’t coming so you can decide if you want to wait, catch another bus or make other plans. This was the number one request from riders in a recent survey about how they use TransitTracker. (Thanks again to everyone who weighed in!)

Why would a bus be canceled? Construction, mechanical problems, accidents, weather conditions and other issues can result in a bus trip—or part of a trip—being canceled. That means some or all of the stops on the route won’t be served.

Until now, when a bus was canceled, TransitTracker would typically show a scheduled time (“2:45 p.m.”) instead of a countdown (“4 min”). That’s what the system does when there’s not enough data to predict an arrival time. But this is misleading because it implies that the bus is going to arrive at that specific time.

In other cases, TransitTracker would show an arrival countdown even though the bus trip had been canceled. After Due had come and gone, you’d wonder, “Did the bus just disappear?”

This is the phenomenon many riders know as “ghost buses.” And it’s particularly frustrating when you’ve been waiting at the stop for a while, only to find out your bus has… well, vanished!

Thankfully, our new bus dispatch system can identify canceled trips and pass that information along to TransitTracker. Now that we can flag those no-shows as “canceled,” there should be far fewer instances of ghost buses, and more reliable arrival information overall. (Note: This won’t get rid of all ghost buses, or any ghost trains for that matter. We expect to address those in future upgrades.)

This is a small but important improvement that we hope will make your life a little easier. We’d like your feedback, too. If you notice any issues with the new canceled-bus notices, or if you have any other comments about TransitTracker, please let us know at transittracker@trimet.org.

WEIGH IN: Discuss this post on Facebook

Dave Whipple

I'm TriMet’s manager of marketing and rider communications. I oversee the agency's web and mobile initiatives and help build useful and usable online tools for riders. I also moonlight as a musician in my spare time.

More Posts

New mobile ticketing app: 38,000 downloads and counting!

TriMet Tickets smartphone app
With our new mobile ticketing app, you can pay your fare with your smartphone.

If the numbers are any indication, TriMet riders are decidedly “on board” with the idea of paying their fare with their phones! As of today, our new TriMet Tickets app for Android and iPhone has been downloaded more than 38,000 times, and we’re seeing anywhere from 300 to 350 new downloads each day.

Why is mobile ticketing so appealing? For one, with no paper tickets to keep track of, boarding the bus or train is a breeze… Tickets can be stored for future use, and of course you can buy your fare whenever and wherever you want.

GET THE APP: Learn more and download the app to try mobile ticketing for yourself.

I’ve spoken with many riders about their experiences with the app, most of whom give it an enthusiastic “thumbs up.”

TriMet Tickets mobile ticketing app
The TriMet Tickets app lets you buy tickets and passes any time, anywhere (anywhere there’s an internet connection, that is). You can store tickets for future use, and even use multiple tickets for groups of riders.

However, since the TriMet Tickets app launched September 4th, we’ve also heard from a number of riders about issues ranging from occasional app freezes or slow response to crashes or even lost tickets.

Some of these problems are minor bugs that either have been fixed or will be fixed in the next version of the app. Others are larger issues that will take longer to resolve. We definitely want your mobile ticketing experience to be a good one, so don’t hesitate to contact us with any feedback as we work out the kinks with this new tech. (This is one of the first ticketing apps of its kind, after all!)

In the meantime, if you’re using the app, or considering downloading it, here are some tips and important reminders to get you started:

Pro tips

  • Activate your ticket before boarding. If you’re at a MAX station where fares are required, make sure you activate your ticket (by tapping the “Use” button) before entering the station area. Otherwise, activate your ticket when you see your bus or train approaching.
  • Watch your battery level… Just like with paper tickets, you’re responsible for making sure you have a valid fare at all times. It’s a good idea to carry a few paper tickets as a back-up just in case you find yourself with a dead battery.
  • A $5 minimum?! Yes, the payment processor’s cost structure is what’s driving the $5 minimum purchase, to avoid extra additional service charges. Sorry! But remember: You don’t have to use your tickets immediately. You can purchase two 2-Hour Tickets and use them any time you want. Regardless, we realize the $5 minimum doesn’t sit well with riders, so we’re looking at all our options as we continue to improve the app. 

Avoiding “lost” tickets

Some riders noticed that their tickets had disappeared after either reinstalling the app or upgrading their phone. Here’s how you can avoid losing your tickets:

  • Don’t uninstall the TriMet Tickets app or erase your phone without transferring your unused tickets first. Your tickets are stored on your phone (which makes it possible to use them without an internet connection), so uninstalling the app can permanently erase your tickets!
  • Create an account before purchasing tickets, as this is the only way you can transfer your unused tickets if you get a new phone later on. (Note: Only unused tickets can be transferred.)

More than half the population owns a smartphone these days, and mobile payments are gaining popularity in the U.S. We expect many more riders will be making the switch from paper tickets in the near future. With your help, we’ll continue to improve the app and make it as useful as possible. If we can make things easier for riders, and make our operations more efficient in the process, it really is a winning solution!

Looking ahead a few years, the TriMet Tickets app is the first step toward an electronic “contactless” fare system, where you’ll be able to pay instantly with your phone, contactless debit/credit card or fare card, by simply tapping on a sensor as you board. Watch for updates about electronic fares and how you can get involved. We expect to begin testing that system with riders in 2016.

For now, please continue to let us know how the TriMet Tickets app is working for you. Send us a note at mobileticketing@mt.trimet.org. Good or bad, we appreciate your feedback. You can also check our website for how-to videos and answers to common questions about the app.

GET THE APP: Learn more and download the app to try mobile ticketing for yourself.

Chris Tucker

Chris Tucker

As Director of Revenue Operations, I lead our agency’s efforts to modernize our fare collection systems. My goal is to provide excellent and efficient service while maintaining reliable, easy-to-use equipment.

More Posts