Heads Up! Pause Your Play When Crossing Tracks and Streets

You see it wherever you go, whether you’re on MAX, a bus, or walking down the street: heads down, staring at a smartphone.

Or maybe you don’t see it because you’re also texting, checking email, scrolling through Facebook or liking pictures on Instagram. Last November, we released this close-call video, in which pedestrians wearing earbuds crossed right in front of a train, seemingly unaware. Now we’re releasing new videos we hope will get people’s attention to “pay attention” when crossing streets and tracks, and when biking as well.

Hold that thought

Hold That Thought

Before you take a look at those videos, stop and consider this: Have you ever bumped into something or someone because you were distracted by your phone? A study by the Pew Research Center found that 53 percent of all adult cell phone users have bumped into something or someone — or have been on the receiving end of a bump — due to distracted walking. Those in the 18-to-24 age range run into this problem even more, with 51 percent admitting to doing the bumping and 71 percent saying they’ve been the “bumpee.” It might look funny on YouTube when it involves a fountain — not so much when it involves a train or bus.

We’ve launched a new safety campaign encouraging people to Pause your play and Hold that thought when crossing train tracks or streets. (You may have noticed the signs on buses, trains and bus stops.) Whether listening to music, talking with a friend, texting or scanning your phone, take just a moment to pause the distraction and be aware of your surroundings before you go.

Stay Alert. Stay Alive.

Every day, bus and rail operators contend with distracted pedestrians and cyclists crossing against signals and showing a lack of awareness around their vehicles. While they do their part to operate our buses and trains safely, we need you to do your part too.

  • Stop, look up from devices and look both ways
  • Obey signals
  • Remove headphones or an earbud, or stop the conversation while crossing
  • Don’t run across, even if it means waiting for the next walk signal or catching the next bus or train
  • Make sure umbrellas, hoods and other apparel don’t block your view

Our cameras captured the following videos. These aren’t meant to shame anyone, but to show how dangerous a lack of awareness is. We want everyone to stay alert and stay alive.

Roberta Altstadt

Roberta Altstadt

I’m TriMet’s public information officer. I communicate with the news media on all TriMet-related topics. When I’m not busy working, I like learning new skills, gardening, and going for walks with my sweet three-legged dog, Ernie.

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Hop Fastpass Will Change the Way You Pay Fare — If You Want It To

When it makes its debut next year, Hop Fastpass™ will change the way many of us ride transit. It will be a convenient option for lots of riders, allowing them to pay their way toward a daily or monthly pass, protect their balance even if they lose their card, and automatically reload funds so they’re never stuck without fare. But rest assured, you can always pay with cash, too.

We’re introducing Hop Fastpass as another option for TriMet, C-TRAN and Portland Streetcar riders — one that many have been dreaming of for years. (Electronic fare systems have been hugely successful in leading transit cities around the world.)

We’ve designed Hop Fastpass to be inclusive and accessible, but you don’t have to use it. You’ll still be able to pay with cash or purchase fares at ticket vending machines or on board buses, just like today. We want to make this clear, especially after seeing some inaccurate information floating around lately.

We do have programs to benefit low-income riders

The benefits of affordable transit are undeniable, and we’re on board. We lowered the cost of Youth fares to $1.25 back in 2014, which helps make transit more affordable for students and low-income families.  We also have $1.5 million dedicated to two programs that provide free or reduced-cost fares to non-profits and community-based organizations that serve low-income individuals and families. These groups are then able to offer fares as part of a suite of services for their clients.

For the many low-income families and individuals who ride frequently, Hop Fastpass offers a great advantage over paper tickets: the pay-as-you-go pass. This allows riders to pay towards a 1-Month Pass in increments as small as $5 – once they’ve paid the equivalent of a monthly pass, the rest of the rides are free that month. This eliminates the upfront cost of a pass while making its significant discount more accessible.

We’re (really) expanding our retail network

Right now, riders can purchase fare from about 130 retailers throughout the service area; with Hop Fastpass, there will be about 500 fare outlets. In the future, Hop Fastpass fare can also be loaded online, using a smartphone app, by phone and at our ticket offices.

And remember: You can always pay fare in cash on buses and at MAX stations.

Each rider needs their own card, but one person can manage multiple accounts

Lots of riders travel in groups, like families or classes, which is why Hop Fastpass will allow one rider to manage multiple accounts. Each rider age 7 and older will need their own card to use Hop Fastpass (just like each needs separate fare today).

Plus, there’s a big benefit to using individual cards: It will allow us to offer pay-as-you-go passes. Pay for two 2½-Hour Tickets in a day and ride free until the end of service; pay the equivalent of a monthly pass in one month and ride free until the next month. This extends the value of passes to more riders, without the upfront cost.

To kick things off, we’ll be giving out about 200,000 free cards, many of which will be available to low-income riders. Otherwise there will be a one-time $3 charge for a new Hop Fastpass card, which is designed to last for up to 10 years. The low card fee (which, when taking advantage of balance protection available with a Hop Fastpass card, is less than the cost of losing a single 1-Day Pass) will help us maintain a wide-reaching and convenient retail network.

crop53 (1 of 1)

You’ll know when you’re running low

The theme of Hop Fastpass is convenience, and that means not having to worry about your account balance. The easiest thing to do is set it and forget it — register your account and activate automatic reloading, so you’re never stuck without fare. But even if you don’t do this, you can always check your balance online, using the app or by phone. And if your balance is running low, you’ll get an alert when you tap on board. And if you don’t have money on your Hop Fastpass card, you can always pay with cash on the bus or at the train station.

Your personal information remains private

Hop Fastpass users’ credit or debit card information will be assigned secure, randomly generated alphanumeric tokens. Cybersource, owned by Visa, will handle all the payment processing for Hop Fastpass and will marry the digital tokens with the corresponding credit or debit card numbers.

Your personal information is safe, too — in fact, we’ll allow you to register your Hop Fastpass account using a four-digit security PIN that you create. We’ll tally the taps on your card to make sure you’re charged the correct fare and to cap your fares once you’ve paid the equivalent of a daily or monthly pass.

We want to know what you think

We know our riders want an electronic fare system, and we want Hop Fastpass to work for as many people as possible. We’ve welcomed public input every step of the way, and we’ll continue to share our progress and listen to riders before, during and after the system makes its debut.

Send us a note or sign up for email updates about Hop Fastpass (especially if you’re interested in the chance to become a beta tester) or to learn about upcoming public meetings and hearings.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Making MAX better will take work, time and patience

The oldest section of the MAX Light Rail system has been providing service to TriMet riders for 30 years — and it’s showing its age. So we’re tackling important necessary updates and improvements that will create better — and more reliable — service.

Improving on-time performance

In the past few years, riders have seen MAX delays and disruptions climb. Some of those delays are because of mechanical issues with sections of track called switches, problems with the electronics that operate signals and other complications with elements of the MAX system. As part of our concentrated efforts to improve MAX on-time performance, we will be replacing and upgrading some trackway materials and elements. In addition to making the system more reliable, many of the improvements will allow us to remove precautionary orders where trains run slower in specific areas.

A system well traveled

Before we take a look forward, let’s take a look back. The first section of the MAX system opened on September 5, 1986. Since then:

  • 666.4 million trips have been taken on MAX
  • 73.9 million miles have been traveled by MAX
  • 367,000 miles, on average, are traveled each month by all MAX trains combined
  • 13,000 miles, on average, are traveled each weekday by all MAX trains combined

It is a system well traveled and now it’s time for targeted major replacements and upgrades.

max-improvement-slide (5 of 7)

Taking MAX into the future

The MAX system is made up of track, switches, overhead catenary (power wire) system, traction power substations, signals and communication systems. Upcoming replacements and upgrades will touch all of them. With MAX trains running about 22 ½ hours a day, it is not possible to do all the work necessary in 1½-hour segments. So our focus is to be strategic and lessen the affect on our riders as much as possible. But the projects will affect you and require your patience, understanding and involvement, possibly even altering how and when you ride. The improvements will lead to MAX disruptions — some service impacts may be a day, others a few weeks in duration.

Here’s a look at some of the major work being planned to make MAX better:

1st Ave MAX Improvements (May 8–21, 2016)

The 1st Ave MAX improvements combine three projects into one. Crews will replace switches — sections of track that allow trains to move from one set of tracks to another — on 1st Avenue near SW Morrison and near NW Couch. They’ll replace wooden ties and other elements under and next to those tracks with updated, longer-lasting materials. At the same time, crews will replace rail in the Skidmore Fountain area. Rails wear over time and this section along 1st Avenue is part of the original MAX alignment in use for three decades. The construction will make it necessary to adjust MAX service, including reducing the number of trains running on the system. We’ll be talking more in the coming weeks about how this will affect your MAX trips during the project.

Rose Quarter TC Improvements (Aug. 21–Sept. 3, 2016)

Later this year, work moves to another of the oldest sections of the MAX system — the Rose Quarter Transit Center area. We’ll be replacing switches as well as realigning the track just east of the transit center, which will require moving poles that hold up the overhead power wire and replacing the signal system, among other work. As with the 1st Ave MAX Improvements, MAX service will need to be adjusted during this project.

SW 11th Ave/Steel Bridge Improvements (2017)

Coming in 2017, we expect two more big projects. During one, crews will replace switches, install new rail and reconstruct the track bed at SW 11th Avenue in Downtown Portland, where the original MAX alignment ended. In a separate project, we expect to begin making improvements to switches, signals and the track across the Steel Bridge.

There are other projects in the works, such as:

  • A four-year replacement of overhead power contact wire from Cleveland Ave in Gresham to Lloyd Center.
  • Upgrade and repair platform areas at Gresham City Hall and Washington Park stations.
  • A multi-year effort to design and upgrade the oldest elevators on the MAX system.

We have an aging system and we have work to do to take MAX into the future. It won’t be easy and we’ll be asking for your patience and understanding during the projects, but the projects will improve the system and your ride.

What we’ve already accomplished

Our Maintenance of Way crews are always busy performing maintenance and improvement projects. Here’s a few recent projects completed:

Doug Kelsey

Doug Kelsey

As chief operating officer, I oversee our transportation, maintenance and information technology divisions. Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with family and being active outdoors, especially cycling. I'm a huge basketball fan, and I'm proud to be a co-founder of one of Canada's largest high school tournaments.

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Instagram Roundup: March

Congratulations on making it through winter — it was a big one, and you did it in style. Now sun’s out (hello, 75 degrees!), everything’s blooming and the days are quickly getting longer.

Not that you’d need to go outside to know this. A quick glance at Instagram confirms that spring is here — these vibrant scenes are filled with color and life:

Tilikum Illuminated, Series 2/4 (facing East) | #tilikumcrossing #ridetrimet #bridges_aroundtheworld #igers_portland #tilikumilluminated

A photo posted by Amanda Ulrich ✨👟✨ (@amandapdxrunforcongo) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

City kids for a day. #portland #trimet

A photo posted by @mikanmorton on

On the train! Off to the airport!!! #guenbttravels #vegas #onthetrain #trimet #airport #blackandwhite 🚟

A photo posted by gmaher (@guenbtdotcom) on

It’s spring vacation now. バスでお出かけ! #bus#pdx#trimet #springbreak

A photo posted by @miauring on

Portland rain #portlandoregon #pnw #downtown #rain #trimet #oregon #exploreportland #nofilter #lighting

A photo posted by She flies with her own wings (@myemeraldvalley) on

My kind of weather! #desaturated #bridge #broadway #steel #portland #pdx #oregon #fog #foggy #trimet #commute

A photo posted by j.todd (@j.todd.desaturated) on

#Bybee #orangelineproject #nofilter #trimet #portlandmax #goodmorning

A photo posted by @brittany_kay_detarr on

As always, tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to share your ride!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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How It Works: Tilikum Crossing Art Lights

By now you’ve seen how Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, lights up the night — but how exactly do those lights work?

There are 178 LED lights aesthetically placed on 40 bridge cables, the four transmission towers above and below the deck, and on the Sonic Dish artwork along the Eastside Esplanade and future Willamette Greenway at the ends of the bridge.

Monitors from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, located in the water near the Morrison Bridge, collect data from the Willamette River. A program developed by digital artist Morgan Barnard translates the data into a colorful and aesthetic display.

(Video: December 2014 Testing)

The temperature of the river controls the color of the lights. Warmer river conditions will display warmer colors, like orange and yellow, while cooler temperatures will display cool colors, like green and blue.

Tilikum Crossing in September (Photo Courtesy: Victor von Salza)
Tilikum Crossing in September (Photo Courtesy: Victor von Salza)
Flickr
Tilikum Crossing in November (Photo Courtesy: Sky Schemer)

Notice how the lights seem to dance across Tilikum Crossing? That’s controlled by the tide. When the tide is coming in, the lights move towards the center of the bridge. As the tide goes out, the lights move towards the ends of the bridge. Additionally, the tide levels affect the speed of the lights. When the tide is higher or lower, the lights move faster. At midpoint, the lights move slowly.

Video Credit: Mike Warner

The speed of the river controls how quickly the colors change. If the river is moving fast, the colors will appear to move and cycle through quicker.

The river’s height affects the contrast in the lights. The higher the river, the more contrasted the colors appear, which affects the pattern and movement of the lights. This change varies with the season, so in the summer (when the river levels are pretty static) the bridge color will appear even and bright. In the spring, when the water tends to move more, the bridge colors will appear more fluid.

While a lot of scientific data is gathered to create this aesthetic light display, the bridge lights aren’t meant to serve as a weather tool. The artists, the late Anna Valentina Murch and Douglas Hollis, wanted these lights to represent a dialogue between the Willamette River and Tilikum Crossing — quite a poetic way to look at the lights, don’t you think?

Learn more about Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People

Learn more about our Public Art Program

Jessica Ridgway

Jessica Ridgway

I'm TriMet's Web and Social Media Coordinator. I develop content for our website and social media channels. I'm a daily MAX rider and an adopted Oregonian.

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The 2016 Spring Break Staycation Guide

If you’ve got a break coming up and you’re staying in town, here are some transit-accessible ideas for when…

Image: Picnic House
You could eat at three different restaurants a day during Portland Dining Month and not try them all. Image: Picnic House

You’re hungry: Portland Dining Month

In a city known for embracing food culture, March is the tastiest month. This year, more than 120 restaurants are offering a three course special for $29. Browse the entire list, which spans 24 (!) categories and restaurants citywide. (And don’t think for a second that there’s a shortage of gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options — there’s a checkbox for that.)

Every day in March at 120+ restaurants throughout Portland. portlanddiningmonth.com

You’re thirsty: Spring Beer & Wine Fest

Not only are 39 great, mostly local breweries and wineries exhibiting at this event — there are also cideries, meaderies, distilleries, cheesemakers and chocolatiers. And the fact that it’s indoors means you don’t have to worry about spring showers diluting your drink!

Oh, and get there early if you can: The first 500 in line on Friday get in free!

March 25 & 26 at Oregon Convention Center. springbeerandwinefest.com

 

Portland Saturday Market
Don’t forget: Saturday Market is open Sundays, too.

You’ve got family in town: Saturday Market

This month marks the return of one of Portland’s longest-running events, Saturday Market (it’s on Sundays, too). At its core, the market is an artists’ community that gives visitors — approximately one million each year — a direct connection to the artisans, makers and artists. Within the 250+ craft and food booths everyone in your party is guaranteed to find something they want, love or simply and inexplicably need to have.

Saturdays and Sundays, March through December at North Waterfront Park and Ankeny Plaza. portlandsaturdaymarket.com

You’re feeling nostalgic: Gresham Skate World and The Tiki Putt

In an age where throwbacks reign supreme, this is the real deal — a neighborhood roller rink that’s been open since the mid-70s. There’s even a Spring Break All-Nighter if you think you’ve got what it takes.

Open daily at 1220 NE Kelly Avenue in Gresham. greshamskateworld.com

If your skating skills are suspect, try the nearby mini-golf course at The Tiki Putt. Its 18 holes feature huts, jungles and an active volcano — plus the whole thing is blacklit.

Open daily at 1776 NW Fairview Drive in Gresham. thetikiputt.com

 

Flickr/Portland Japanese Garden
The Strolling Pond is one of many serene spaces at the Portland Japanese Garden. Image: Flickr/Portland Japanese Garden

You need a close-in getaway: Portland Japanese Garden

After a six-month closure to work on an expansion, this local treasure has reopened its doors. It’s been hailed as one of the most authentic Japanese gardens outside of Japan, and a stroll around the grounds (you’ll visit the Natural Garden, Sand and Stone Garden, Flat Garden, Strolling Pond Garden and Tea Garden) makes this abundantly, serenely, beautifully clear.

Open daily in Washington Park. japanesegarden.com

You need a wardrobe update: The Mall

You’ve earned your break, why not treat yourself? Head over to the shop whose Instagrams you’re always liking and see what’s in store. Or go to the mall and surprise yourself (any mall will do, but Washington Square, Clackamas Town Center and Lloyd Center are the biggest). We love spring because it symbolizes a fresh start, and a new outfit pairs well with a new outlook.

 

Train to Plane
We’ll take you right to the terminal.

You’re leaving town: Portland International Airport

It’s been quite a winter. So if your plan is to get far, far away (a week of sun and sand, perhaps) we’ve got you. Skip the parking and catch the train to the plane — MAX Red Line trains arrive at PDX about every 15 minutes during the day.

(We can get you to Amtrak and Union Station, too!)

trimet.org/traintoplane

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Instagram Roundup: February

After a few years in Portland, you become accustomed to the February Fakeout: a string of mild, sunny days that tricks you into thinking spring has begun. But inevitably the rain returns and you realize daylight saving time hasn’t even started.

Even if they don’t last, these days are a good pick-me-up for commuters coming out of a dark, damp winter. For proof, just look at the sun and the blossoms in some of your photos from the last few weeks:

Follow the glow of the distant sun.

A photo posted by Fredo R. (@supfredo) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

Happy Monday! 😊

A photo posted by Penelope The Hedgehog (@hedgiepenelope) on

left intentionally or unintentionally, me gusta 🌸 #pdxblooms #trimetmax

A photo posted by Angelica M. Millán Lozano (@antagoniista) on

Riding the public transit may not be an exciting occurrence for most people, but as a large group of people and dogs board the bus or train, it becomes a lot more interesting. Of course it’s not just for fun, it’s very important for our guide dog puppies to learn how to properly board public transit and sit or lay quietly and calmly while it rumbles along. As a guide dog they will likely utilize buses, trains, or other forms of public transportation with their handler so while they are in training with us we expose them to that experience, often many times, to ensure that they are comfortable and confident doing so. Our puppies had the opportunity to demonstrate just how awesome they are at that on Tuesday when we boarded a bus with ten puppies and headed to the mall for a very big outing (to be announced in the following post). #guidedogsfortheblind #Sightmasters Pictured above is now 14-month-old yellow lab, Ryan, relaxing on a commuter train on a previous club outing. He is laying down on the blue speckled floor, tucked under a seat on a raised step. The edge of the raised area is outlined with a yellow stripe. His paws are hanging over the edge, one hanging down and the other sticking straight out, and he is looking directly at the camera. #ryan

A photo posted by Sightmasters (@sightmasters) on

An aptly placed etching | #tilikumcrossing #pdxsunrise #ridetrimet

A photo posted by Amanda Ulrich ✨👟✨ (@amandapdxrunforcongo) on

| Tilikum #Transitnerdery | #🌉 #🔳 #transitnerd #bridgevibe #igers_portland #portlandnw #pdxavsquad #trimet

A photo posted by G R A N T 🍀 O’C O N N E L L (@ghoconnell) on

Tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to show us your stuff in March!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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First batch of new buses take to the streets

3500 buses (4 of 7)

For the fifth year in a row, we’re getting new buses for our riders—making your trips more comfortable, safe and reliable. As part of our ongoing bus replacement program, we’re adding 77 new diesel-powered buses to our fleet over the next several months! (Cue the cartwheels and back flips.)

You might see one of these new 3500-series buses — 10 of them will be on city streets this week. In the next few months, five more buses will arrive every week from the Gillig factory in Hayward, Calif., as we gradually place them into service.

Once we receive them from the factory, it can take up to a month to get a bus road-ready. We need to install fare boxes, exterior mirrors and radio systems, check the engine and air systems, perform road tests, and get licenses and paperwork approved by DMV.

All 77 are expected to be rolling throughout the metro area by the end of May. They join the 249 other “new” buses we’ve put on the streets since 2012.

Outside of being shiny and new, you won’t notice any big differences compared to the buses we’ve purchased the past few years. Like their recent predecessors, they’ll all have air conditioning, automatic stop announcements, an upgraded dispatch system for improved customer information, easy-to-clean vinyl seats, anti-microbial interior surfaces and low floors (which makes it easier to board). In fact, all of our regular-service buses will have low floors by the end of 2017!

The new buses cost about $470,000 each. Most of them will be housed at the Center Street Garage in SE Portland.

Younger fleet

We began our bus replacement program in 2012. By summer, we’ll have 326 newer buses on the road. About two years ago, the average age of TriMet’s fleet was 12 years. Once all the 3500s are in the regular rotation this spring, we’ll be very close to the industry average of eight years (Woohoo!).

Some buses in our fleet, such as the series 2200, 2100 and 2000s, have been running since President Clinton’s first term. They’ll stick around a short while longer for backup.

What’s next

We’re not done upgrading our bus fleet. We plan to acquire 50 more in fiscal year 2017, 57 the next year and 70 the year after that. It’s part of our commitment to bring more service to you — and make sure you get to your destination safely and comfortably.

Want to drive a bus? We’re hiring bus operators!

Andrew Longeteig

Andrew Longeteig

I’m TriMet’s Communications Coordinator. I share what’s happening at the agency with the media and general public. When I’m not working, I’ll either be watching the Blazers or at a rock concert.

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Four Ways to Celebrate Black History Month

In a smart Slate piece about more thoughtful ways to celebrate Black History Month, Aisha Harris implores readers to do more — to make an effort to learn something new about the black community or experience.

So if you haven’t already, now’s a great time to start. We’ve gathered some ideas below — these upcoming events will broaden your perspective and offer insight into the past, present and future of African-American culture. Each is guaranteed to be engaging and thought-provoking, and all are accessible by transit.

Cascade Festival of African Films

Thursday, Friday and Saturday screenings through March 5 at PCC Cascade Campus’ Moriarty Arts & Humanities Building. Free.

woman

The films being shown this year take on subjects as varied as urban life, gender equality and religious fundamentalism, but the majority of them share a common trait: They were made by African directors. This makes for a great opportunity to explore the continent’s diverse cultures through the lens of first-hand experience.

The festival’s centerpiece film, Run, plays February 19 at 7 p.m. at the Hollywood Theatre. Free.

The festival’s centerpiece film is Run, which takes place in the present-day Ivory Coast. The story reflects on the journey of a man named Run, who is in hiding after assassinating the country’s prime minister. It’s described as “impassioned and poetic…a strong allegory for the people and history of contemporary Ivory Coast.”

Portland Black Film Festival

Through February 27 at the Hollywood Theatre. General admission $8.

Bringing things closer to home, this young film festival focuses on the black experience in America. Seven films will be screened, including A Ballerina’s Tale, the story of prodigal ballerina Misty Copeland, and the only known print of Catch My Soul, a 1974 rock opera treatment of Othello (!).

African American Read-In

February 14 at 2 p.m. at the North Portland Library; Teen Read-In is February 26 at 4 p.m. at the St. Johns Library. Free.

Two Multnomah County Libraries have gathered community leaders, teachers, students and local celebrities to read from their favorite books by black authors — but you can do more than just listen. Everyone will be able to share words from their favorite works, and children and young adults will be able to enjoy special gatherings.

PDX Jazz Fest

February 18–26 at a dozen Portland venues. Tickets for individual shows from $15.

High-Res_Alicia_Olatuja_0937_1600x600b

This festival began 13 years ago as a Black History Month initiative to heighten jazz outreach and education in Portland, and now it’s bringing world-class performances to our city. Jazz is one of America’s most celebrated art forms, with roots in hundreds of years of the black experience — but it’s not all history. What you’ll discover at these shows and talks is that jazz is an ever-evolving medium.

So whether you’re at an intimate club like the iconic Jimmy Mak’s or seated in the Newmark Theater, taking in a tribute to the greats or watching a virtuoso harpist who has recorded with Drake, you’re sure to marvel at how vital jazz really is.


The final point Harris makes in her article is that we need to continue this conversation year-round — not just every February. So after you’ve enjoyed the festivals and events, consider that there is infinitely more to share and learn. There are people to meet, businesses to become acquainted with, books to read and lots of history to consider.

All this is especially important to us as a transit service (as everyone who knows Rosa Parks’ story can attest). We have an ongoing responsibility to steer our legacy toward fairness, understanding and appreciation — that’s what drives our transit equity and diversity work, and why we encourage everyone to celebrate Black History Month.

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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Instagram Roundup: January

We rang in January with free rides on New Year’s Eve — not long after that came the snow (and lots of it). Our Instagram feed was filled with great shots of wintry commutes, lights and bridges…and pancakes. Here’s a look at some of the photos you shared with us last month:

Pretty pretty in my Bridge City today ❄️ #SnowAtLast

A photo posted by Madison Daisy (@missmadisondaisy) on

Follow @ridetrimet on Instagram »

#cloudyday crossing #tilikumcrossing #bridge #portland #oregon #pnw #trimet #gooutside

A photo posted by portland oregon based person (@nutsandboltsphoto) on

#commute #trimet #publictransportation #gobytransit #train #tigard #oregon

A photo posted by Sabrina (@fromaway) on

The Tilikum Crossing after OMSI After Dark last weekend, gotta love Portland at night.

A photo posted by Harrison Kistler (@harrisonkistler) on

Mass Transit pt II. . . . #oregon #explore #pdx #portland #pnw #vsco #vscocam #perspective

A photo posted by Jeff Toreson (@jeffsview) on

Beautiful view of @ridetrimet making its way over the Steel Bridge. What a dreamy city! 😍 #downtownPDX #PDX

A photo posted by Downtown Portland (@downtownpdx) on

Street Car Vibes • 008|366 Portland is really transit friendly. |#BrowniesWestCoastWinter

A photo posted by A L E X (@dearmrjack) on

What have you come up with this month? Tag @ridetrimet and #GoByTransit to show us your stuff!

Brian Lum

Brian Lum

I'm TriMet's Web & Social Media Coordinator. I'm here to help tell our story, and to share the interesting things I find along the way. When I'm not here, you'll find me out riding my bike and taking pictures.

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